Tuesday, 23 January 2018 / TRUTH-OUT.ORG

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Alicia Garza

Alicia Garza

Alicia Garza is an organizer, writer and freedom dreamer living and working in Oakland, California.  She is the special projects director for the National Domestic Workers Alliance, the nation's leading voice for dignity and fairness for the millions of domestic workers in the United States, most of whom are women. She is also the co-creator of #BlackLivesMatter, a national organizing project focused on combatting anti-Black state sanctioned violence. Alicia's work challenges us to celebrate the contributions of Black queer women's work within popular narratives of Black movements, and reminds us that the Black radical tradition is long, complex and international. Her activism connects emerging social movements, without diminishing the specificity of the structural violence facing Black lives. She is a contributor to the Truthout anthology Who Do You Serve, Who Do You Protect? and has been the recipient of numerous awards for her organizing work, including the Root 100 2015 list of African American achievers and influencers between the ages of 25 and 45, and was featured in the Politico50 guide to the thinkers, doers and visionaries transforming American politics in 2015.

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Alicia Garza

Alicia Garza

Alicia Garza is an organizer, writer and freedom dreamer living and working in Oakland, California.  She is the special projects director for the National Domestic Workers Alliance, the nation's leading voice for dignity and fairness for the millions of domestic workers in the United States, most of whom are women. She is also the co-creator of #BlackLivesMatter, a national organizing project focused on combatting anti-Black state sanctioned violence. Alicia's work challenges us to celebrate the contributions of Black queer women's work within popular narratives of Black movements, and reminds us that the Black radical tradition is long, complex and international. Her activism connects emerging social movements, without diminishing the specificity of the structural violence facing Black lives. She is a contributor to the Truthout anthology Who Do You Serve, Who Do You Protect? and has been the recipient of numerous awards for her organizing work, including the Root 100 2015 list of African American achievers and influencers between the ages of 25 and 45, and was featured in the Politico50 guide to the thinkers, doers and visionaries transforming American politics in 2015.