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2015.20.4 BF BUchheit(Photo: DonkeyHotey)PAUL BUCHHEIT FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

Every American deserves a share of our country's co-owned wealth. While the Kochs and the Waltons may not be lining up to collect their checks, most families will, and they will benefit immensely, as will the economy in an inevitable surge of consumer spending. It's not redistribution or a handout, because each family will be reimbursed for the use of its share of the air and the land and the water, and for 70 years of labor and taxes.

Americans want to work, but available jobs don't provide a living wage. Almost three-quarters of people receiving public assistance are members of working families.

As a result of their low pay, almost two-thirds of Americans would be unable to cover a $1,000 emergency room visit with funds from their bank accounts. A national dividend would help to fix that. There are several powerful reasons why this should happen.

COLE MELLINO OF ECOWATCH ON BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

aaaDivestHarvard(Photo: EcoWatch)Many students have vowed to ramp up their divestment campaigns at universities across America this spring. One group who has garnered much media attention is Divest Harvard, which is wrapping up a week-long campaign known as “Harvard Heat Week.” Harvard has the largest endowment of any university in the world at $36.4 billion, and hundreds of alumni including Bill McKibben, founder of 350.org, and former Colorado Senator Tim Wirth are participating in the group’s efforts this week.

After a week of sit-ins that have shut down administration offices at Massachusetts Hall, President Faust finally reached out directly to students with Divest Harvard. ”I would be happy to meet with you and a representative group of your student colleagues when you have ceased disrupting university operations,” wrote President Faust in an email.

The students however were not pleased with the offer for another closed door meeting and called for a more open process on divestment that schools like MIT have convened. Divest Harvard has made multiple requests for a more transparent process involving the entire student body, faculty and alumni. The group knows there is strong support for divestment because the student body voted 72 percent in favor of divestment and hundreds of faculty and thousands of alumni signed a letter supporting the initiative.

MARK KARLIN, EDITOR OF BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

aaaincome inequality 2 ratio(Chart: SmartAsset)

According to an analysis conducted by SmartAsset.com, the only time the widening income gap narrowed in recent years - and then only slightly - was when the federal minimum wage was increased during the years from 2007-2009.  However, as the chart above from SmartAsset.com indicates, once the initial impact of the rise in the minimum wage had its effect, the income inequality gap started to rise again. The study focused on average management pay as compared to average food service worker pay.

In using statistics from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, SmartAsset.com found:

While the federal minimum wage has been raised twice in the past 18 years, many states have enacted and raised their own minimum wages to keep pace with inflation and the rising cost of living. The impact of those state laws is evident in the state measurements of the income inequality ratio.

Of the 21 states with a minimum wage either at or below the federal limit (as of 2013), including the five states with no minimum wage law, six rank among the top ten states with the largest disparity between management and foodservice earnings in 2013. On the other hand, none of the seven states that had a minimum wage at least one dollar higher than the federal minimum in 2013 were among the top ten for highest inequality between management and foodservice workers.

The widespread national protests for a $15 minimum federal wage, as well as increased wages in general for the working poor, thus would move toward providing a livable wage to those in the most underpaid jobs. However, the reduction in the inequality gap is only temporary, if the minimum wage doesn't continue to rise. Why is that? Because the salaries of managers, in the comparison provided in the chart above, rise much faster than minimum wage jobs. 

WALTER BRASCH FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

aaaSick(Photo: Calleamanecer)Snaking its way through the Pennsylvania legislature is a bill that will block local governments from requiring companies to provide sick leave, even if unpaid, that is more than required by state or federal regulations.

There are no Pennsylvania or federal regulations requiring companies to provide sick leave. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that 39 percent of all employees, and 79 percent of all employees in food service and hotel industries, have no sick leave. Unlike the United States, about 130 countries require employers to provide at least one week of sick leave per employee.

The Republican-controlled state Senate passed the bill, 37–12; the Republican-controlled House will now discuss it—and probably follow the Senate's wishes.

Gov. Tom Wolf opposes this legislation, will probably veto it, and then have to deal with a Senate that has enough votes to override that veto.

The proposed legislation is in response to Philadelphia's recent directive that requires companies with at least 10 employees to provide mandatory sick leave for its workers. Several metropolitan U.S. cities, as well as California, Connecticut, and Massachusetts, already require companies to provide sick leave to employees.

Republicans are hypocritically philosophically conflicted on the legislation. Their party believes in limited government regulation, and this bill would keep government out of private enterprise's believed-right to treat workers as serfs.

Thursday, 16 April 2015 08:28

Overfished Stocks at All-Time Low

2015.16.4 BF Eco(Photo: Kris Krüg)ANASTASIA PANTSIOS OF ECOWATCH ON BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

The number of US domestic fishing stocks listed as overfished or threatened by overfishing declined to the fewest number since 1997, according to the 2014 Status of US Fisheries report to Congress from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). NOAA has only been compiling the report since 1997, so that’s the lowest number yet, which indicates significant progress in managing fishing stocks.

A stock is on the overfishing list when annual catch is too high; it is considered overfished when the population size is too low.

“This report illustrates that the science-based management process under the Magnuson-Stevens Act is working to end overfishing and rebuild stocks,” said Eileen Sobeck, assistant NOAA administrator for fisheries. “While we have made tremendous progress, we know there’s more work to be done—especially as we continue to document changes to our world’s oceans and ecosystems. We will continue to strive toward sustainable management of our nation’s fisheries in order to preserve our oceans for future generations.”

The Magnuson-Stevens Fisheries Conservation and Management Act (MFCMA) was initially passed in 1976 to oversee fishing in federal waters. The Sustainable Fisheries Act of 1996 amended the original legislation to define overfishing, require regular assessment of overfished populations and mandate plans for the recovery of overfished populations as well as the reduction of bycatch—unwanted marine life caught in the process of fishing.

The NOAA report cited two stocks that have rebounded enough to be removed from the overfished list—gag grouper in the Gulf of Mexico and North Atlantic albacore. The North Atlantic albacore and another five fish populations were removed from the overfishing list: haddock in the Gulf of Maine, gag grouper in the south Atlantic, snowy grouper on the southern Atlantic coast, Jacks complex in the Gulf of Mexico and Bluefin tuna in the western Atlantic.

MARK KARLIN, EDITOR OF BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

130275552 c44efdbbcb z(Photo: kyle rw)

If you want another indicator of how much the United States has devalued education, take a look at college adjunct instructors. These are essentially part-time professors who are often paid so little, they need government financial assistance to survive.

Given cutbacks in government funding of higher education, increasing top college administrator salaries, recruitment of top professors with higher salaries to help universities compete in a corporatized academic environment and other economic pressures, institutions of higher learning are relying more on part-time faculty who are frequently paid penurious wages.

According to an April 15 article in Marketwatch.com,

A quarter of the growing number of part-timers who are teaching college students need some government help to get by, according to a study from the University of California Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education.

Nearly 100,000 of these part-time faculty, generally known as adjuncts, benefit from the earned income tax credit and, to a lesser extent, Medicaid and the CHIP health-care program for children, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, previously known as food stamps, and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, or TANF, according to the study.

“It’s shocking, but it’s the reality,” said Carol Zabin, research director at the Center for Labor Research and Education. “Universities are depending much more on part-time and adjunct faculty.”

2015.16.4 KRAFFSwirls of toxic petcoke dust on the Southeast Side of Chicago in a residential neighborhood. (Photo: David Barboza)GEORGIA KRAFF FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

David versus Goliath – that is how Tom Shepherd and Peggy Salazar of the Southeast [Side of Chicago] Environmental Task Force of Chicago describe their fight. Goliath, in this case, is KCBX Terminals, a division of Koch Industries.

Chicago’s Southeast Side, once an industrial hub of the steel industry, has now become a dumping ground for a filthy waste product of the petroleum industry petcoke: Piles of the stuff, some as high as an eight-story building are being dumped along the banks of the Calumet River. The BP oil refinery across the state line in Whiting, Indiana, produces the coke in the process of refining the tar sands being piped down from Alberta, Canada. BP has sub-contracted KCBX Terminals to handle the material from there.

Dust from the piles fills the air with every breeze. During particularly windy days, the area is as dark as night. Petcoke, the dregs of tar-sands refining is an oily, powdery substance that coats everything it touches – window sills, cars and laundry drying on clothes lines. It cannot be brushed off the skin; it must be washed off with soap and water.

JESSICA ENNIS OF ECOWATCH ON BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

aaaMarylandSolar(Photo: EcoWatch)This week, the Maryland General Assembly took a key step forward to allow more Marylanders than ever to access solar energy by passing community solar legislation. Community solar projects allow multiple people to subscribe to one solar energy project and offset a portion of their electric bill from the energy generated through a credit.

The bills, HB 1087 and SB 398, create a three-year pilot program that will allow for the construction of community solar projects and will examine the impact of community solar in the state and best practices throughout the U.S.

Community solar is important because approximately 80 percent of Marylanders are currently unable to choose solar energy, either because they have shaded roofs, are renters, can’t afford a full system or don’t have access to their roof. By passing the legislation, the General Assembly created the potential for all Marylanders to benefit from solar energy.

In addition to creating access, this legislation also opens up more places for solar panels to be set up. Community solar projects can be sited in a variety of places, like the roof of an apartment building, a community center, a church or even in an open field.

If the governor signs the bill, Maryland will join 10 other states with a community solar policy. Such a law would keep Maryland at the forefront of clean energy policy. By transitioning away from burning fossil fuels to expanding clean energy, Maryland is taking major step toward lessening the impacts of climate change on our environment and on our health.

BILL BERKOWITZ FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

aaaGayPride(Photo: Kencf0618)Dr. James Dobson is talking about a second "Civil War." Rick Scarborough of Vision America Action is calling it "a Bonhoeffer moment," a reference to Dietrich Bonhoeffer, the German Lutheran pastor who resisted the Nazis. Other Christian leaders are complaining that gay Activists are duping the masses.

As America awaits two and a half hours of oral argument at the Supreme Court set for the morning of Tuesday, April 28th, followed by its decision – likely in late June -- on the power of the states to ban same-sex marriages and to refuse to recognize such marriages performed in another state, the Christian right's doom and gloom squad is coming out of the closet in droves. And they're bringing the type of unrestrained rhetoric not heard since, well, those heady days last month when Indiana and Arkansas were forced to temper their strict anti-gay "religious freedom" laws.

With thirty-seven states currently allowing gay marriage and opinion polls showing over 60 per cent of the public supporting same-sex marriage, the tide has clearly turned. Many Christian right leaders, however, will not accept the memo, and instead are predicting that dreadful things will befall America should the US Supreme Court rule that same sex marriage is the law of the land. A major brief has been filed, a conference call for Christian right leaders to vent was held, and Republican Senators are also weighing in on the issue.

The underlying threat from the religious right was clearly stated by the Family Research Council's Tony Perkins, when, shortly after President Barack Obama's re-election, he warned of "a revolt, a revolution" if the Supreme Court rules in favor of same-sex marriage, with "Americans saying, 'You know what? Enough of this!'"

MARK KARLIN, EDITOR OF BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

ahillaryhardchoiceWhat about Hillary's Chipotle moment? (Photo: Mike Mozart)

If you haven't read about Hillary Clinton's alleged moment of anonymity in a Chipotle franchise the other day, then you need to google the name of the national fast food chain. On Google's news feed, more than 10,000 articles were archived about it as of 9:30 AM EST on April 15.

What purportedly happened to merit such humongous coverage (not to mention television and radio reports galore)? As most of the corporate media reports would have it, the narrative goes something like this: As the former secretary of state and senator was driving in a black van - preciously nicknamed "Scooby" - from Chautauqua, New York, to Iowa (site of the first primary, actually a caucus) on a "meet the people" campaign, she and her trusted aide Huma Abedin stopped for lunch in Maumee, Ohio (just south of Toledo) around 1 PM EST on Monday, April 13. 

Wearing sunglasses, the two ordered their own food (no Secret Service or lackeys to carry the food in site), ate and left. They otherwise went unnoticed, as the news accounts "report."

Despite the fact that some pundits mocked Clinton for not being identified in the Chipotle, the reality is that the early campaign stunt produced enormous publicity that made Clinton look like an everyday citizen of the US buying and carrying her own lunch in a restaurant far different that the usual dining spots of a person paid $200,000 per speech. With just one public relations stunt, Clinton's campaign was able to portray her as an everyday person.

With the tsunami of coverage of Clinton's "Where's Waldo?" moment, why does BuzzFlash at Truthout speculate that the incident was all planned, down to the sunglasses and determined effort to remain unnoticed.

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