Friday, 24 November 2017 / TRUTH-OUT.ORG
  • Thanksgiving Distorts History and Sugarcoats Continuing State Violence Against Indigenous People

    By Jaskiran Dhillon, Truthout | Op-Ed

    The celebratory zeal of Thanksgiving is part of the state's machinery that allows us to abdicate political responsibility and turn a blind eye to the persistent colonial violence.While often valorized as a time of celebration characterized by the benign coming together of friends and family, Thanksgiving is also a holiday that actively elides the genocidal violence that has made the US. (Image: Jared Rodriguez / Truthout, after Jean Leon Gerome Ferris)

    Though promoted as a time for celebration and warm family gatherings, the Thanksgiving tradition is yet another distortion of the genocidal settler colonial history of the United States. When we celebrate the day, we participate in the state's campaign to abdicate political responsibility for the continuing violence inflicted upon Indigenous peoples, their culture and their land.

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  • Bridging the Gap Between Movements and Elections: How the Working Families Party Organized in 2017

    Bridging the Gap Between Movements and Elections: How the Working Families Party Organized in 2017

    By Sarah Jaffe, Truthout | Interview

    The Working Families Party (WFP) has a unique role in US electoral politics: providing the tactical electoral skills to help progressive candidates from new social movements get elected to local office, says the party's national campaigns and communications director Joe Dinkin. Many of the progressives who won in recent elections did so with the full organizing support of the WFP behind them.

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  • Would You Put a Tiny House for a Homeless Person in Your Backyard?

    Would You Put a Tiny House for a Homeless Person in Your Backyard?

    By Valerie Schloredt, YES! Magazine | Report

    With an economy powered by tech giants like Amazon and Microsoft, Seattle is the fastest-growing major city in the United States. But in the Beacon Hill neighborhood of Seattle, homelessness persists, where old and new, prosperity and depravation live side by side. Two Seattle homeowners were willing to make space, and a 75-year-old man who's been homeless for years now has a house and a community.

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