Sunday, 25 June 2017 / TRUTH-OUT.ORG

THIS IS NOT A PAYWALL

Unlike many media outlets, Truthout never blocks your access to the latest news: There is not a single ad or paywall on our site.

Instead, reader donations have kept us online for more than 15 years.

If you value what you read at Truthout, help keep our nonprofit newsroom strong.

Click here
to donate.

In Photos: New Orleans Remembers and Resists

Thursday, September 03, 2015 By Mike Ludwig and Laura Borealis, Truthout | Photo Essay
  • font size decrease font size decrease font size increase font size increase font size
  • Print

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

All photos: Laura Borealis

New Orleans observed the 10-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina with a cacophony of sights, sounds and emotions that blurred the lines between art and politics, truth and contradiction, and life and death. While elected officials and the mainstream media focused heavily on the city's "resilience," activists on the ground were organizing around a different theme: resistance. In the lead up to the anniversary, racial justice groups held a summit and launched a website, www.katrinatruth.org, to remind the powers that be in Louisiana - and the rest of the country - that the city's recovery efforts have mostly benefited white residents and prioritized private profit over people. Then came the second line parades. This is what resistance looks like in New Orleans.

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

A girl prepares to perform with Black feminist artists in front of the levee wall in the Lower Ninth Ward during the memorial second line on August 29. The second line began where the levee wall failed during Katrina, releasing a torrent of water that left the historically Black neighborhood in ruins.

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

Performers with ECOHYBRIDITY, a collaboration of Black feminist artists who held a roaming "visual black opera" on the Katrina anniversary, perform at the levee wall during the second line. Many people who lived in the Lower Ninth War before Katrina have still not returned to their homes.

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

ECOHYBRIDITY constructed a mock house as a float that reads, "Housing is a human right." Before Katrina, there were 12,270 public housing units available in New Orleans, and now there are only 2,006. More than 90 percent of the nearly 15,000 families currently on waiting lists for either public housing or Section 8 assistance are Black families, according to KatrinaTruth.org.

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

Youth march in the second line parade. At least 50 percent of Black children in New Orleans live in poverty, more than before Katrina.

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

The Warriors, a youth dance crew and color guard, march in the second line parade. Many New Orleans schools were privatized after Katrina, and now 92 percent of students attend private charter schools. Advocates say harsh discipline polices at charter schools deny students equal access to education, and 15 charter schools in New Orleans have higher suspension rates the rest of the nation. In 2013, there were 46,625 out-of-school suspensions, more than the total number of students in the local school system.

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

The Katrina memorial second line was more political than most second lines, as activists from New Orleans and across the country joined the parade.

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

Alicia Garza, a founder of the Black Lives Matter movement, speaks at a racial justice summit held in New Orleans shortly before the Katrina anniversary.

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

ECOHYBRIDITY performers march into position as prison resistance video is projected across the walls of the Orleans Parish Prison, the jail in New Orleans that became infamous for human rights abuses after Katrina. Jail officials have been tussling with the local government and the Justice Department over reforms ever since. There are five times as many Black inmates than white inmates in Louisiana prisons. The state's white population is double that of the Black population. "I hope they can hear us," an organizer said before raising a fist toward the jail.

Copyright, Truthout. May not be reprinted without permission.

Laura Borealis

Laura Borealis is a photojournalist and social justice activist based in New Orleans.

Mike Ludwig

Mike Ludwig is an investigative reporter at Truthout and a contributor to the Truthout anthology, Who Do You Serve, Who Do You Protect? Follow him on Twitter: @ludwig_mike.


Hide Comments

blog comments powered by Disqus
GET DAILY TRUTHOUT UPDATES
Optional Member Code

FOLLOW togtorsstottofb


In Photos: New Orleans Remembers and Resists

Thursday, September 03, 2015 By Mike Ludwig and Laura Borealis, Truthout | Photo Essay
  • font size decrease font size decrease font size increase font size increase font size
  • Print

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

All photos: Laura Borealis

New Orleans observed the 10-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina with a cacophony of sights, sounds and emotions that blurred the lines between art and politics, truth and contradiction, and life and death. While elected officials and the mainstream media focused heavily on the city's "resilience," activists on the ground were organizing around a different theme: resistance. In the lead up to the anniversary, racial justice groups held a summit and launched a website, www.katrinatruth.org, to remind the powers that be in Louisiana - and the rest of the country - that the city's recovery efforts have mostly benefited white residents and prioritized private profit over people. Then came the second line parades. This is what resistance looks like in New Orleans.

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

A girl prepares to perform with Black feminist artists in front of the levee wall in the Lower Ninth Ward during the memorial second line on August 29. The second line began where the levee wall failed during Katrina, releasing a torrent of water that left the historically Black neighborhood in ruins.

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

Performers with ECOHYBRIDITY, a collaboration of Black feminist artists who held a roaming "visual black opera" on the Katrina anniversary, perform at the levee wall during the second line. Many people who lived in the Lower Ninth War before Katrina have still not returned to their homes.

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

ECOHYBRIDITY constructed a mock house as a float that reads, "Housing is a human right." Before Katrina, there were 12,270 public housing units available in New Orleans, and now there are only 2,006. More than 90 percent of the nearly 15,000 families currently on waiting lists for either public housing or Section 8 assistance are Black families, according to KatrinaTruth.org.

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

Youth march in the second line parade. At least 50 percent of Black children in New Orleans live in poverty, more than before Katrina.

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

The Warriors, a youth dance crew and color guard, march in the second line parade. Many New Orleans schools were privatized after Katrina, and now 92 percent of students attend private charter schools. Advocates say harsh discipline polices at charter schools deny students equal access to education, and 15 charter schools in New Orleans have higher suspension rates the rest of the nation. In 2013, there were 46,625 out-of-school suspensions, more than the total number of students in the local school system.

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

The Katrina memorial second line was more political than most second lines, as activists from New Orleans and across the country joined the parade.

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

Alicia Garza, a founder of the Black Lives Matter movement, speaks at a racial justice summit held in New Orleans shortly before the Katrina anniversary.

(Photo: Laura Borealis)

ECOHYBRIDITY performers march into position as prison resistance video is projected across the walls of the Orleans Parish Prison, the jail in New Orleans that became infamous for human rights abuses after Katrina. Jail officials have been tussling with the local government and the Justice Department over reforms ever since. There are five times as many Black inmates than white inmates in Louisiana prisons. The state's white population is double that of the Black population. "I hope they can hear us," an organizer said before raising a fist toward the jail.

Copyright, Truthout. May not be reprinted without permission.

Laura Borealis

Laura Borealis is a photojournalist and social justice activist based in New Orleans.

Mike Ludwig

Mike Ludwig is an investigative reporter at Truthout and a contributor to the Truthout anthology, Who Do You Serve, Who Do You Protect? Follow him on Twitter: @ludwig_mike.


Hide Comments

blog comments powered by Disqus