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The House on Junction

Tuesday, August 15, 2017 By Anne Elizabeth Moore and Melissa Mendes, Truthout | Graphic Journalism
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Truthout readers made this story possible. Show your support for independent news by making a tax-deductible donation today!

House on Junction I The property tax foreclosure crisis in Detroit -- linked, nearly inexplicably, to the city's confusing and dangerous water shut-off policies -- is far from the only housing concern city residents face. In fact, the housing frustrations homeowners now face have deep roots in the city's past.

We'll let a local expert fill you in on that story, in this month's episode of our comics journalism investigation into Water, Land, and Housing in Michigan. It's the first of two strips detailing the experience of one resident, Joseph Bates, trying to stay in his family's ancestral home.  (You won't want to miss our installment next month, either, when we finally meet Joe and hear the gripping story of his home in Detroit.)

House on Junction I

ENDNOTES:

  1. Joe Bates' address at St. Matthews and St. Joseph's Episcopal Church, a part of a press conference put on July 8, 2017 by the Coalition to End Unconstitutional Tax Foreclosures. Further details were provided in a personal interview with Bates that afternoon.
  2. "Wanted—A Room.," Paula Meredith, Detroit Free Press, April 14, 1907, page 53.
  3. "Mother of Two Trails Ex-Husband, Jails Him," Detroit Free Press, May 3, 1927, page 15.
  4. Ibid.
  5. "Ten Fascinating Facts About Detroit's Fisher Building," Dan Austin, Detroit Free Press, September 1, 2015. Accessed July 22, 2017: http://www.freep.com/story/news/2015/08/31/detroit-fisher-building/71460314/
  6. Unsigned article, Detroit Free Press, December 5, 1945, Page 18.
  7. Origins of the Urban Crisis, Thomas J. Sugrue, Princeton University Press (1996, New Jersey), pages 19-21.
  8. Sugrue, page 23.
  9. Raw data from Ethnic Groups in Detroit, 1951, Albert Mayer, Wayne University (1951, Detroit), page 43.
  10. Sugrue, page 211.
  11. Sugrue, page 220.
Copyright, Truthout. May not be reprinted without permission.

Anne Elizabeth Moore and Melissa Mendes

Anne Elizabeth Moore is a comics journalist, cultural critic, and author of several award-winning, best-selling nonfiction books including Unmarketable (The New Press), Cambodian Grrrl, and Threadbare (Microcosm Publishing). She is a Fulbright scholar, a USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism Fellow, and is the recipient of a 2016 Write A House Fellowship in Detroit. Her work has appeared in The Baffler, Al Jazeera, Salon, The Onion, Talking Points Memo, Wilson Quarterly, Tin House, and in international art exhibitions, including the Whitney Biennial and a solo show at the MCA Chicago. She has appeared on CNN, NPR, Voice of America, and in The New York Times, among others. Her most recent book, from Curbside Splendor, is Body Horror: Capitalism, Fear, Misogyny, Jokes.

Melissa Mendes was born and raised in Western Massachusetts. In 2010, after graduating from the Center for Cartoon Studies, she won a Xeric award to self-publish her book Freddy Stories. Since then, she's worked with Anne on Threadbare and Harvey and Me, published a graphic novel called Lou, and is now working on an epic family saga called The Weight, based on her late grandfather's life. You can see more of her work at mmmendes.com.

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The House on Junction

Tuesday, August 15, 2017 By Anne Elizabeth Moore and Melissa Mendes, Truthout | Graphic Journalism
  • font size decrease font size decrease font size increase font size increase font size
  • Print

Truthout readers made this story possible. Show your support for independent news by making a tax-deductible donation today!

House on Junction I The property tax foreclosure crisis in Detroit -- linked, nearly inexplicably, to the city's confusing and dangerous water shut-off policies -- is far from the only housing concern city residents face. In fact, the housing frustrations homeowners now face have deep roots in the city's past.

We'll let a local expert fill you in on that story, in this month's episode of our comics journalism investigation into Water, Land, and Housing in Michigan. It's the first of two strips detailing the experience of one resident, Joseph Bates, trying to stay in his family's ancestral home.  (You won't want to miss our installment next month, either, when we finally meet Joe and hear the gripping story of his home in Detroit.)

House on Junction I

ENDNOTES:

  1. Joe Bates' address at St. Matthews and St. Joseph's Episcopal Church, a part of a press conference put on July 8, 2017 by the Coalition to End Unconstitutional Tax Foreclosures. Further details were provided in a personal interview with Bates that afternoon.
  2. "Wanted—A Room.," Paula Meredith, Detroit Free Press, April 14, 1907, page 53.
  3. "Mother of Two Trails Ex-Husband, Jails Him," Detroit Free Press, May 3, 1927, page 15.
  4. Ibid.
  5. "Ten Fascinating Facts About Detroit's Fisher Building," Dan Austin, Detroit Free Press, September 1, 2015. Accessed July 22, 2017: http://www.freep.com/story/news/2015/08/31/detroit-fisher-building/71460314/
  6. Unsigned article, Detroit Free Press, December 5, 1945, Page 18.
  7. Origins of the Urban Crisis, Thomas J. Sugrue, Princeton University Press (1996, New Jersey), pages 19-21.
  8. Sugrue, page 23.
  9. Raw data from Ethnic Groups in Detroit, 1951, Albert Mayer, Wayne University (1951, Detroit), page 43.
  10. Sugrue, page 211.
  11. Sugrue, page 220.
Copyright, Truthout. May not be reprinted without permission.

Anne Elizabeth Moore and Melissa Mendes

Anne Elizabeth Moore is a comics journalist, cultural critic, and author of several award-winning, best-selling nonfiction books including Unmarketable (The New Press), Cambodian Grrrl, and Threadbare (Microcosm Publishing). She is a Fulbright scholar, a USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism Fellow, and is the recipient of a 2016 Write A House Fellowship in Detroit. Her work has appeared in The Baffler, Al Jazeera, Salon, The Onion, Talking Points Memo, Wilson Quarterly, Tin House, and in international art exhibitions, including the Whitney Biennial and a solo show at the MCA Chicago. She has appeared on CNN, NPR, Voice of America, and in The New York Times, among others. Her most recent book, from Curbside Splendor, is Body Horror: Capitalism, Fear, Misogyny, Jokes.

Melissa Mendes was born and raised in Western Massachusetts. In 2010, after graduating from the Center for Cartoon Studies, she won a Xeric award to self-publish her book Freddy Stories. Since then, she's worked with Anne on Threadbare and Harvey and Me, published a graphic novel called Lou, and is now working on an epic family saga called The Weight, based on her late grandfather's life. You can see more of her work at mmmendes.com.