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Arundhati Roy: Jungles of Resistance

Sunday, June 17, 2012 By Arundhati Roy, Making Contact | Report
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Renowned Indian author Arundhati Roy says her country's government has declared war on its own people. Her outspokenness earned her an invitation to spend time with Maoist rebels. On this edition, Arundhati Roy takes us into the jungles of India, as she reads excerpts from her new book 'Walking with the Comrades'.

Special thanks to the Center for Place Culture and Politics at the City University of New York's Graduate Center.

Featuring:

Arundhati Roy, author of "The God of Small Things" and "Walking with the Comrades"

For More Information:

Articles

MUSIC:

  • Khandit Nayaka by Nucleya
This piece was reprinted by Truthout with permission or license. It may not be reproduced in any form without permission or license from the source.

Arundhati Roy

Arundhati Roy is an Indian novelist, activist and a world citizen. She won the Booker Prize in 1997 for her first novel The God of Small Things.

Since winning the Booker Prize, she has concentrated her writing on political issues. These include the Narmada Dam project, India's Nuclear Weapons, corrupt power company Enron's activities in India. She is a figure-head of the anti-globalization/alter-globalization movement and a vehement critic of neo-imperialism.

In response to India's testing of nuclear weapons in Pokhran, Rajasthan, Roy wrote The End of Imagination, a critique of the Indian government's nuclear policies. It was published in her collection The Cost of Living, in which she also crusaded against India's massive hydroelectric dam projects in the central and western states of Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh and Gujarat.

Roy was awarded the Sydney Peace Prize in May 2004 for her work in social campaigns and advocacy of non-violence.

In June 2005 she took part in the World Tribunal on Iraq. In January 2006 she was awarded the Sahitya Akademi award for her collection of essays, 'The Algebra of Infinite Justice', but declined to accept it.

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Arundhati Roy: Jungles of Resistance

Sunday, June 17, 2012 By Arundhati Roy, Making Contact | Report
  • font size decrease font size decrease font size increase font size increase font size
  • Print


Renowned Indian author Arundhati Roy says her country's government has declared war on its own people. Her outspokenness earned her an invitation to spend time with Maoist rebels. On this edition, Arundhati Roy takes us into the jungles of India, as she reads excerpts from her new book 'Walking with the Comrades'.

Special thanks to the Center for Place Culture and Politics at the City University of New York's Graduate Center.

Featuring:

Arundhati Roy, author of "The God of Small Things" and "Walking with the Comrades"

For More Information:

Articles

MUSIC:

  • Khandit Nayaka by Nucleya
This piece was reprinted by Truthout with permission or license. It may not be reproduced in any form without permission or license from the source.

Arundhati Roy

Arundhati Roy is an Indian novelist, activist and a world citizen. She won the Booker Prize in 1997 for her first novel The God of Small Things.

Since winning the Booker Prize, she has concentrated her writing on political issues. These include the Narmada Dam project, India's Nuclear Weapons, corrupt power company Enron's activities in India. She is a figure-head of the anti-globalization/alter-globalization movement and a vehement critic of neo-imperialism.

In response to India's testing of nuclear weapons in Pokhran, Rajasthan, Roy wrote The End of Imagination, a critique of the Indian government's nuclear policies. It was published in her collection The Cost of Living, in which she also crusaded against India's massive hydroelectric dam projects in the central and western states of Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh and Gujarat.

Roy was awarded the Sydney Peace Prize in May 2004 for her work in social campaigns and advocacy of non-violence.

In June 2005 she took part in the World Tribunal on Iraq. In January 2006 she was awarded the Sahitya Akademi award for her collection of essays, 'The Algebra of Infinite Justice', but declined to accept it.