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Ladydrawers: Let's Go Shopping

Tuesday, September 10, 2013 By Julia Gfrörer and Anne Elizabeth Moore, Truthout | Graphic Journalism
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2013 0910ld fbThe Ladydrawers' year-long look at the global garment and sex trades began in August with an introductory strip called Fast Fashion. Our second strip from Julia Gfrörer and Anne Elizabeth Moore begins where, ideally, the production line should end: at H&M, Zara, Forever 21, and other fast-fashion retail stores. That's where the wear and tear of sped-up production is clear, if you just talk to the people whose job it is to put the clothes out on the floor every day. 

Of course, the monstrous second-hand industry in the US means first-run retail stores are not the real end of the production line, but Gfrörer and Moore will be back next month to tell you more about labor and economics in the cast-off garment trade. As always, you can catch all the strips from the very beginning right here.

Click here to open comic full-size in new window.
2013 0910ld

Copyright, Truthout. May not be reprinted without permission.

Anne Elizabeth Moore

Anne Elizabeth Moore is a cultural critic and author of several award-winning, best-selling nonfiction books including Unmarketable (The New Press) and Cambodian Grrrl (Cantankerous Titles). She is a Fulbright scholar, a USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism Fellow, and is the recipient of a 2016 Write A House Fellowship in Detroit. Her work has appeared in The Baffler, Al Jazeera, Salon, The Onion, Talking Points Memo, Wilson Quarterly, Tin House, and in international art exhibitions, including the Whitney Biennial and a solo show at the MCA Chicago. She has appeared on CNN, NPR, Voice of America, and in The New York Times, among others. Her most recent book, from Curbside Splendor, is Body Horror: Capitalism, Fear, Misogyny, Jokes.

Julia Gfrörer

Julia Gfrörer was born in 1982 in Concord, NH, and currently lives and works in Portland, OR. Her work has appeared in Thickness, Arthur Magazine, and Best American Comics, and her graphic novel, Black Is the Color, will be published by Fantagraphics in October 2013. Her last name rhymes with 'despair.'
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Ladydrawers: Let's Go Shopping

Tuesday, September 10, 2013 By Julia Gfrörer and Anne Elizabeth Moore, Truthout | Graphic Journalism
  • font size decrease font size decrease font size increase font size increase font size
  • Print

2013 0910ld fbThe Ladydrawers' year-long look at the global garment and sex trades began in August with an introductory strip called Fast Fashion. Our second strip from Julia Gfrörer and Anne Elizabeth Moore begins where, ideally, the production line should end: at H&M, Zara, Forever 21, and other fast-fashion retail stores. That's where the wear and tear of sped-up production is clear, if you just talk to the people whose job it is to put the clothes out on the floor every day. 

Of course, the monstrous second-hand industry in the US means first-run retail stores are not the real end of the production line, but Gfrörer and Moore will be back next month to tell you more about labor and economics in the cast-off garment trade. As always, you can catch all the strips from the very beginning right here.

Click here to open comic full-size in new window.
2013 0910ld

Copyright, Truthout. May not be reprinted without permission.

Anne Elizabeth Moore

Anne Elizabeth Moore is a cultural critic and author of several award-winning, best-selling nonfiction books including Unmarketable (The New Press) and Cambodian Grrrl (Cantankerous Titles). She is a Fulbright scholar, a USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism Fellow, and is the recipient of a 2016 Write A House Fellowship in Detroit. Her work has appeared in The Baffler, Al Jazeera, Salon, The Onion, Talking Points Memo, Wilson Quarterly, Tin House, and in international art exhibitions, including the Whitney Biennial and a solo show at the MCA Chicago. She has appeared on CNN, NPR, Voice of America, and in The New York Times, among others. Her most recent book, from Curbside Splendor, is Body Horror: Capitalism, Fear, Misogyny, Jokes.

Julia Gfrörer

Julia Gfrörer was born in 1982 in Concord, NH, and currently lives and works in Portland, OR. Her work has appeared in Thickness, Arthur Magazine, and Best American Comics, and her graphic novel, Black Is the Color, will be published by Fantagraphics in October 2013. Her last name rhymes with 'despair.'