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Applauding Black Death in the Hour of Chaos

Tuesday, October 21, 2014 By Mariame Kaba, Prison Culture | Op-Ed
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You need not die today.
Stay here — through pout or pain or peskyness.
Stay here. See what the news is going to be tomorrow.
- Gwendolyn Brooks

On Monday night, I heard a 19 year old young black man say that he wasn't afraid to die for justice in Ferguson. Some in the assembled multi-racial audience applauded. I wanted to throw up.

2014 1021 kaba 1St. Louis, October 11, 2014. (Photo: Page May)

What does it mean to be willing to die for a cause in a society that already considers you to be hyper-disposable? Your evisceration, your death is desirable and actively pursued. What if the revolutionary act in such a society, in such a world, is to live out loud instead? Or simply to live.

I wanted to yell: "No. Stay a while. We don't need any more black 19 year olds in caskets." How are we to reconcile a call for the state to stop killing us with a willingness to die for that end?

I can't get the clapping out of my head.

What were the people who clapped applauding? Did they clap because they thought the young man was courageous? Were they clapping because they too were prepared to die? Did they clap because they were trapped in a 20th century documentary titled 'real freedom fighters are willing to die for justice?' Were they clapping in support of black martyrdom? Were they applauding black death?

Why were they clapping? I can't stop thinking of it.

On Saturday, while we were in St. Louis, my comrade Kelly took a photo of a young woman standing on the bed of a truck exuberantly chanting: "Back up! Back up! We want freedom, freedom! All these racist ass cops, we don't need 'em, need 'em!"

2014 1021 kaba 2St. Louis, October 11, 2014. (Photo: Kelly Hayes)

Some people chanted along with her while the familiar refrain of 'hands up, don't shoot' reverberated across most of the crowd. Fists up. Voices loud. All around me was love and life. I saw the young woman as I marched past her. In looking at the photograph later, I thought that it captured the youthful resistance that permeated the St. Louis march/rally and has characterized so much of this Ferguson moment.

2014 1021 chaos 3St. Louis, October 11, 2014. (Photo: Page May)

When the young man on Monday's panel described justice as the prosecution of officer Darren Wilson, the man who killed Mike Brown, I felt as if I was dissolving. Maybe I left my body for a second or a minute or I don't know how long. This is the 'justice' for which this young man was prepared to die? This small, narrow, insignificant in the larger scheme of the world thing? We have failed our young by not creating an expansive idea of justice. And then I thought about the fact that his peers had mentioned that they had "nothing" to begin with and I knew that justice would center on addressing that as THE issue.

I kept my mouth shut. I hope that the young man stays in the struggle and that he like so many others in Ferguson and across the country refuses to be quiet. Most of all though, I wish for him a long and healthy life in a future with more justice and some peace.

Graves grow no green that you can use.
Remember, green's your color. You are Spring. – G. Brooks

This piece was reprinted by Truthout with permission or license. It may not be reproduced in any form without permission or license from the source.

Mariame Kaba

Mariame Kaba is an organizer, educator, and writer who lives in Chicago. Her work focuses on ending violence, dismantling the prison industrial complex, and supporting youth leadership development. She is the founder and director of Project NIA, a grassroots organization with a mission to end youth incarceration.


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Applauding Black Death in the Hour of Chaos

Tuesday, October 21, 2014 By Mariame Kaba, Prison Culture | Op-Ed
  • font size decrease font size decrease font size increase font size increase font size
  • Print

You need not die today.
Stay here — through pout or pain or peskyness.
Stay here. See what the news is going to be tomorrow.
- Gwendolyn Brooks

On Monday night, I heard a 19 year old young black man say that he wasn't afraid to die for justice in Ferguson. Some in the assembled multi-racial audience applauded. I wanted to throw up.

2014 1021 kaba 1St. Louis, October 11, 2014. (Photo: Page May)

What does it mean to be willing to die for a cause in a society that already considers you to be hyper-disposable? Your evisceration, your death is desirable and actively pursued. What if the revolutionary act in such a society, in such a world, is to live out loud instead? Or simply to live.

I wanted to yell: "No. Stay a while. We don't need any more black 19 year olds in caskets." How are we to reconcile a call for the state to stop killing us with a willingness to die for that end?

I can't get the clapping out of my head.

What were the people who clapped applauding? Did they clap because they thought the young man was courageous? Were they clapping because they too were prepared to die? Did they clap because they were trapped in a 20th century documentary titled 'real freedom fighters are willing to die for justice?' Were they clapping in support of black martyrdom? Were they applauding black death?

Why were they clapping? I can't stop thinking of it.

On Saturday, while we were in St. Louis, my comrade Kelly took a photo of a young woman standing on the bed of a truck exuberantly chanting: "Back up! Back up! We want freedom, freedom! All these racist ass cops, we don't need 'em, need 'em!"

2014 1021 kaba 2St. Louis, October 11, 2014. (Photo: Kelly Hayes)

Some people chanted along with her while the familiar refrain of 'hands up, don't shoot' reverberated across most of the crowd. Fists up. Voices loud. All around me was love and life. I saw the young woman as I marched past her. In looking at the photograph later, I thought that it captured the youthful resistance that permeated the St. Louis march/rally and has characterized so much of this Ferguson moment.

2014 1021 chaos 3St. Louis, October 11, 2014. (Photo: Page May)

When the young man on Monday's panel described justice as the prosecution of officer Darren Wilson, the man who killed Mike Brown, I felt as if I was dissolving. Maybe I left my body for a second or a minute or I don't know how long. This is the 'justice' for which this young man was prepared to die? This small, narrow, insignificant in the larger scheme of the world thing? We have failed our young by not creating an expansive idea of justice. And then I thought about the fact that his peers had mentioned that they had "nothing" to begin with and I knew that justice would center on addressing that as THE issue.

I kept my mouth shut. I hope that the young man stays in the struggle and that he like so many others in Ferguson and across the country refuses to be quiet. Most of all though, I wish for him a long and healthy life in a future with more justice and some peace.

Graves grow no green that you can use.
Remember, green's your color. You are Spring. – G. Brooks

This piece was reprinted by Truthout with permission or license. It may not be reproduced in any form without permission or license from the source.

Mariame Kaba

Mariame Kaba is an organizer, educator, and writer who lives in Chicago. Her work focuses on ending violence, dismantling the prison industrial complex, and supporting youth leadership development. She is the founder and director of Project NIA, a grassroots organization with a mission to end youth incarceration.


Hide Comments

blog comments powered by Disqus