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Saudi Arabia's Exploding Christmas Gifts From Hillary Clinton

Sunday, 06 March 2016 00:00 By Medea Benjamin and Rebecca Green, PINKtank | Op-Ed
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A street in Houthi rebel stronghold of Saada, Yemen, which has been badly damaged in bombardments by the Saudi-led military coalition, Sept. 7, 2015. In 2011, then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton celebrated the sale of over 80 F-15 fighter jets to Saudi Arabia - the same jets being used on Yemen now, with no end in sight. (Photo: Tyler Hicks / The New York Times)A street in Houthi rebel stronghold of Saada, Yemen, which has been badly damaged in bombardments by the Saudi-led military coalition, September 7, 2015. In 2011, then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton celebrated the sale of over 80 F-15 fighter jets to Saudi Arabia - the same jets being used on Yemen now, with no end in sight. (Photo: Tyler Hicks / The New York Times)

As Hillary Clinton emerges as the front-runner for the Democratic Party's presidential candidate, she is receiving increased scrutiny for her years as Secretary of State. Many are criticizing her hawkish foreign policy, which is the best indication of what President Hillary's foreign policy would be, with many focusing on her long relationship with Saudi Arabia.

On Christmas Eve in 2011, Hillary Clinton and her closest aides celebrated a $29.4 billion sale of over 80 F-15 fighter jets, manufactured by US-based Boeing Corporation, to Saudi Arabia. In a chain of enthusiastic emails, an aide exclaimed that it was "not a bad Christmas present."

These are the very fighter jets the Saudis have been using to intervene in the internal affairs of Yemen since March 2015. A year later, at least 2,800 Yemeni civilians have been killed, mostly by airstrikes - and there is no end in sight. The indiscriminate Saudi strikes have killed journalists and ambulance drivers. They have hit the Chamber of Commerce, facilities supported by Médecins Sans Frontières (also known as Doctors Without Borders), a wedding hall, and a center for the blind. The attacks have also targeted ancient heritage sites in Yemen. International human rights organizations are saying that the Saudi-led strikes on Yemen may amount to war crimes.

During her tenure as Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton made weapons transfers to the Saudi government a "top priority," according to a new report published in The Intercept. While Clinton's State Department was deeply invested in getting weapons to Saudi Arabia, the Clinton Foundation accepted millions of dollars in donations from both the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the weapons manufacturer Boeing. Christmas presents were being gifted all around.

Despite the brutal attacks on Yemen and egregious domestic human rights violations, Saudi Arabia remains the number one US ally in the Arab world. While the original US interest was to secure Saudi's vast oil reserves, today only 10% of oil used in the United States now comes from the Kingdom. US dependence on Saudi oil has been superseded by US dependence on weapons sales. The most recent Saudi weapons deal was made in November 2015, a deal worth $1.29 billion that included 22,000 smart and general purpose bombs, and over 5,000 Joint Direct Attack Munitions kits to convert older bombs into precision-guided weapons using GPS signals. The Pentagon's Defense Security Cooperation Agency justified the sales, saying they helped "sustain strong military-to-military relationships between the United States and Saudi Arabia."

It's hard to exaggerate the enormity and high-tech nature of Saudi weapons purchases; the sales in the decade of 2010 constitute the most enormous military sales in history. According to a White House press release in 2014, "The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is the largest US Foreign Military Sales customer, with active and open cases valued at approximately $97 billion, as Saudi forces build capabilities across the full spectrum of regional challenges." The weapons include F-15 bombers, Apache and Blackhawk helicopters, missile defense systems, missiles, bombs, armored vehicles, and related equipment and services. Weapons manufacturers such as Boeing, Raytheon, Lockheed Martin, General Dynamics and McDonnell Douglas have been unapologetically pushing these sales to offset military spending cuts in the United States and Europe.

While the US government continues to provide massive amounts of weapons to Saudi, on February 25 the European Union took the extraordinary step of voting for an EU-wide arms embargo to Saudi Arabia; while non-binding, it is a powerful statement that will put pressure on all European governments. Already, government committees in England have urged Prime Minister David Cameron to suspend arms sales to Saudi Arabia; Germany has pledged to review all future arms sales to the Kingdom; and in Belgium the government has denied an export license to ship weapons to the country. Canadian activists are also pressuring their government in light of Canada's $15 billion transaction with Riyadh for weaponized armored vehicles, the biggest manufacturing export deal ever struck in Canada.

US activists must follow the example of our European allies and demand that our government stop supplying the Saudi rulers with weapons to bomb civilians in Yemen and repress its own citizens. Join CODEPINK for the Summit on Saudi Arabia March 5-6 to learn more and get involved. If you can't make it in person, watch the livestream at www.therealnews.com.

This piece was reprinted by Truthout with permission or license. It may not be reproduced in any form without permission or license from the source.

Rebecca Green

Rebecca Green is the Washington, DC, office coordinator at CODEPINK. She is a student at Northeastern University with a sociology degree and a minor in women's gender and sexuality studies.

Medea Benjamin

Medea Benjamin is a cofounder of CODEPINK and the fair trade advocacy group Global Exchange. She is the author of Drone Warfare (OR Books, 2012) and has played an active role in the Green Party. She has a Master's degree in both public health and economics. In 2012, she was awarded the US Peace Memorial Foundation's Peace Prize; she is also recipient of the 2014 Gandhi Peace Award and the 2010 Martin Luther King, Jr. Peace Prize from the Fellowship of Reconciliation.

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Saudi Arabia's Exploding Christmas Gifts From Hillary Clinton

Sunday, 06 March 2016 00:00 By Medea Benjamin and Rebecca Green, PINKtank | Op-Ed
  • font size decrease font size decrease font size increase font size increase font size
  • Print

A street in Houthi rebel stronghold of Saada, Yemen, which has been badly damaged in bombardments by the Saudi-led military coalition, Sept. 7, 2015. In 2011, then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton celebrated the sale of over 80 F-15 fighter jets to Saudi Arabia - the same jets being used on Yemen now, with no end in sight. (Photo: Tyler Hicks / The New York Times)A street in Houthi rebel stronghold of Saada, Yemen, which has been badly damaged in bombardments by the Saudi-led military coalition, September 7, 2015. In 2011, then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton celebrated the sale of over 80 F-15 fighter jets to Saudi Arabia - the same jets being used on Yemen now, with no end in sight. (Photo: Tyler Hicks / The New York Times)

As Hillary Clinton emerges as the front-runner for the Democratic Party's presidential candidate, she is receiving increased scrutiny for her years as Secretary of State. Many are criticizing her hawkish foreign policy, which is the best indication of what President Hillary's foreign policy would be, with many focusing on her long relationship with Saudi Arabia.

On Christmas Eve in 2011, Hillary Clinton and her closest aides celebrated a $29.4 billion sale of over 80 F-15 fighter jets, manufactured by US-based Boeing Corporation, to Saudi Arabia. In a chain of enthusiastic emails, an aide exclaimed that it was "not a bad Christmas present."

These are the very fighter jets the Saudis have been using to intervene in the internal affairs of Yemen since March 2015. A year later, at least 2,800 Yemeni civilians have been killed, mostly by airstrikes - and there is no end in sight. The indiscriminate Saudi strikes have killed journalists and ambulance drivers. They have hit the Chamber of Commerce, facilities supported by Médecins Sans Frontières (also known as Doctors Without Borders), a wedding hall, and a center for the blind. The attacks have also targeted ancient heritage sites in Yemen. International human rights organizations are saying that the Saudi-led strikes on Yemen may amount to war crimes.

During her tenure as Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton made weapons transfers to the Saudi government a "top priority," according to a new report published in The Intercept. While Clinton's State Department was deeply invested in getting weapons to Saudi Arabia, the Clinton Foundation accepted millions of dollars in donations from both the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the weapons manufacturer Boeing. Christmas presents were being gifted all around.

Despite the brutal attacks on Yemen and egregious domestic human rights violations, Saudi Arabia remains the number one US ally in the Arab world. While the original US interest was to secure Saudi's vast oil reserves, today only 10% of oil used in the United States now comes from the Kingdom. US dependence on Saudi oil has been superseded by US dependence on weapons sales. The most recent Saudi weapons deal was made in November 2015, a deal worth $1.29 billion that included 22,000 smart and general purpose bombs, and over 5,000 Joint Direct Attack Munitions kits to convert older bombs into precision-guided weapons using GPS signals. The Pentagon's Defense Security Cooperation Agency justified the sales, saying they helped "sustain strong military-to-military relationships between the United States and Saudi Arabia."

It's hard to exaggerate the enormity and high-tech nature of Saudi weapons purchases; the sales in the decade of 2010 constitute the most enormous military sales in history. According to a White House press release in 2014, "The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is the largest US Foreign Military Sales customer, with active and open cases valued at approximately $97 billion, as Saudi forces build capabilities across the full spectrum of regional challenges." The weapons include F-15 bombers, Apache and Blackhawk helicopters, missile defense systems, missiles, bombs, armored vehicles, and related equipment and services. Weapons manufacturers such as Boeing, Raytheon, Lockheed Martin, General Dynamics and McDonnell Douglas have been unapologetically pushing these sales to offset military spending cuts in the United States and Europe.

While the US government continues to provide massive amounts of weapons to Saudi, on February 25 the European Union took the extraordinary step of voting for an EU-wide arms embargo to Saudi Arabia; while non-binding, it is a powerful statement that will put pressure on all European governments. Already, government committees in England have urged Prime Minister David Cameron to suspend arms sales to Saudi Arabia; Germany has pledged to review all future arms sales to the Kingdom; and in Belgium the government has denied an export license to ship weapons to the country. Canadian activists are also pressuring their government in light of Canada's $15 billion transaction with Riyadh for weaponized armored vehicles, the biggest manufacturing export deal ever struck in Canada.

US activists must follow the example of our European allies and demand that our government stop supplying the Saudi rulers with weapons to bomb civilians in Yemen and repress its own citizens. Join CODEPINK for the Summit on Saudi Arabia March 5-6 to learn more and get involved. If you can't make it in person, watch the livestream at www.therealnews.com.

This piece was reprinted by Truthout with permission or license. It may not be reproduced in any form without permission or license from the source.

Rebecca Green

Rebecca Green is the Washington, DC, office coordinator at CODEPINK. She is a student at Northeastern University with a sociology degree and a minor in women's gender and sexuality studies.

Medea Benjamin

Medea Benjamin is a cofounder of CODEPINK and the fair trade advocacy group Global Exchange. She is the author of Drone Warfare (OR Books, 2012) and has played an active role in the Green Party. She has a Master's degree in both public health and economics. In 2012, she was awarded the US Peace Memorial Foundation's Peace Prize; she is also recipient of the 2014 Gandhi Peace Award and the 2010 Martin Luther King, Jr. Peace Prize from the Fellowship of Reconciliation.

Related Stories

Saudi Arabia Is Killing Civilians With US Bombs
By Marjorie Cohn, teleSUR | Op-Ed
Hillary the Hawk
By Stephen Zunes, The Cairo Review of Global Affairs | News Analysis

Hide Comments

blog comments powered by Disqus