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On Rosh Hashanah: Recommitting to Solidarity in the Face of White Supremacy

Thursday, September 21, 2017 By Brant Rosen, Truthout | Op-Ed
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This must be our response to white supremacy: that a threat to any one of us is a threat to all," writes Brant Rosen, calling for a new commitment to building solidarity-based movements in the Jewish New Year. Here, members of Holy Blossom Temple, a Toronto Synagogue, form a protective circle around the Imdadul Mosque in North York in Canada on February 3, 2017, following an Islamophobic attack on a mosque in Quebec City that left six Muslim worshippers dead and nineteen wounded. (Photo: Bernard Weil / Toronto Star via Getty Images)"This must be our response to white supremacy: that a threat to any one of us is a threat to all," writes Brant Rosen, calling for a new commitment to building solidarity-based movements in the Jewish New Year. Here, members of Holy Blossom Temple, a Toronto Synagogue, form a protective circle around the Imdadul Mosque in North York in Canada on February 3, 2017, following an Islamophobic attack on a mosque in Quebec City. (Photo: Bernard Weil / Toronto Star via Getty Images)

When Temple Beth Israel -- a large Reform synagogue in downtown Charlottesville, Virginia -- opened for Shabbat morning services on August 12, 2017, its congregants had ample reason to be terrified. Prior to the "Unite the Right" rally held in town by white supremacists and neo-Nazis that weekend, some neo-Nazi websites had posted calls to burn down their synagogue.

The members of Beth Israel decided to go ahead with services, but they removed their Torah scrolls just to be safe. When services began, they noticed three men dressed in fatigues and armed with semi-automatic rifles standing across the street from their synagogue. Throughout the morning, growing numbers of neo-Nazis gathered outside their building. Worshippers heard people shouting, "There's the synagogue!" and chanting, "Sieg Heil!" At the end of services, they had to leave in groups through a side door.

Of course, this story did not occur in a vacuum. It was but a part of a larger outrage that unfolded in Charlottesville that day, and part of a still larger outrage has been unfolding in our country since November. I think it's safe to say that many Americans have learned some very hard truths about their country since the elections last fall. Many -- particularly white liberals -- are asking out loud: Where did all of this come from? Didn't we make so much progress during the Obama years? Can there really be that many people in this country who would vote for an out-and-out xenophobe who unabashedly encourages white supremacists as his political base? Is this really America?

Yes, this is America. White supremacy -- something many assumed was relegated to an ignoble period of American history -- is, and has always been, very real in this country. White supremacists and neo-Nazis are in the streets -- and they are being emboldened and encouraged by the president of the United States.

While this new political landscape may feel surreal, I'd suggest that this is actually a clarifying moment. Aspects of our national life that have remained subterranean for far too long are now being brought out into the light. We are now being brought face to face with systems and forces that many of us assumed were long dead; that we either couldn't see or chose not to see. Following the election of Trump many have commented that it feels like we are living through a bad dream. I would claim the opposite. I would say that many of us are finally waking up to real life -- a reality that, particularly for the most marginalized among us, never went away.

It is certainly a profoundly clarifying moment for American Jews. With this resurgence of white supremacist anti-Semitism, it would have been reasonable to expect a deafening outcry from the American Jewish establishment. But that, in fact, has not been the case. When Trump appointed white nationalist Steve Bannon to a senior White House position, there was nary an outcry from mainstream Jewish organizations. The Zionist Organization of America actually invited Bannon to speak at its annual gala.

Why would the Israeli Prime Minister call a president who panders to anti-Semitic white supremacists "brave" and "courageous?" Because Trump pledged his support to Israel.

Israel's response to this political moment is no less illuminating. During a huge spike in anti-Semitic vandalism and threats against Jewish institutions immediately after the elections, it wasn't only Trump that had to be goaded into making a statement -- the Israeli government itself remained shockingly silent. This same government that never misses an opportunity to condemn anti-Semitic acts by Muslim extremists seemed utterly unperturbed that over 100 Jewish institutions had received bomb threats or that Jewish cemeteries were desecrated across the country. (More than 500 headstones were knocked down at one Jewish cemetery alone in Philadelphia.) And when neo-Nazis with tiki torches rallied in Charlottesville proclaiming "Jews will not replace us," it took Prime Minister Netanyahu three days to respond with a mild tweet. Israel's Diaspora Minister Naftali Bennett, whom one would assume should be concerned with anti-Semitism anywhere in the Diaspora, had this to say:

We view ourselves as having a certain degree of responsibility for every Jew in the world, just for being Jewish, but ultimately it's the responsibility of the sovereign nation to defend its citizens.

This is a clarifying moment if ever there was one. Support for Israel and its policies trumps everything -- yes, including white supremacist Jew hatred. Just this week, Prime Minister Netanyahu said this about Trump's speech at the UN:

I've been ambassador to the United Nations, and I'm a long-serving Israeli prime minister, so I've listened to countless speeches in this hall. But I can say this -- none were bolder, none were more courageous and forthright than the one delivered by President Trump today.

Why would the Israeli Prime Minister call a president who panders to anti-Semitic white supremacists "brave" and "courageous?" Because Trump pledged his support to Israel. Because he called the Iran nuclear deal an "embarrassment." Because he vowed American support to allies who are "working together throughout the Middle East to crush the loser terrorists."

Historically speaking, this is not the first time that Zionists have cozied up to anti-Semites in order to gain their political support. Zionism has long depended on anti-Semites to validate its very existence. This Faustian bargain was struck as far back as the 19th century, when Zionist leader Theodor Herzl met with the Russian minister of the interior Vyacheslav von Plehve, an infamous anti-Semite who encouraged the Kishinev pogroms that very same year. Plehve pledged that as long as the Zionists encouraged emigration of Jews from Russia, the Russian authorities would not disturb them.

It makes perfect sense that Israeli leaders are loath to condemn the rise of white supremacy. After all, they have a different enemy they want to sell to us.

This Zionist strategy was also central to the diplomatic process that led to the 1917 Balfour Declaration, in which British Foreign Secretary Arthur Balfour announced his government's support for "the establishment of a national home in Palestine for the Jewish people." Although Balfour has long been lionized as a Zionist hero, he wasn't particularly well known for his love for Jews or the Jewish people. When he was prime minister, his government passed the 1905 Aliens Act, severely restricting immigration at a time in which persecuted Jews were emigrating from Eastern Europe. At the time, Balfour spoke of the "undoubted evils which had fallen on the country from an alien immigration which was largely Jewish." Balfour, like many Christians of his class, "did not believe that Jews could be assimilated into Gentile British society."

When you think about it, it makes perfect sense that Israeli leaders are loath to condemn the rise of white supremacy. After all, they have a different enemy they want to sell to us. They want us to buy their Islamophobic narrative that "radical Muslim extremism" is the most serious threat to the world today. And you can be sure they view Palestinians as an integral part of this threat.

We cannot underestimate how important this narrative is to Israel's foreign policy -- indeed, to its own sense of validation in the international community. Netanyahu is so committed to this idea, in fact, that two years ago he actually went as far as to blame Palestinians for starting the Holocaust itself. In a speech to the Zionist Congress, he claimed that in 1941, the Palestinian Grand Mufti convinced Hitler to launch a campaign of extermination against European Jewry at a time when Hitler only wanted to expel them. This ludicrous historical falsehood was so over the top that a German government spokesperson eventually released a statement that essentially said, "No, that's not true. Actually, the Holocaust was our fault."

Meanwhile, Netanyahu is pursuing an alliance with the anti-Semitic populist Prime Minister of Hungary, Viktor Orbán. When Netanyahu recently traveled to Hungary to meet with Orbán, leaders of the Hungarian Jewish community publicly criticized Netanyahu, accusing him of "betrayal."

If there was ever any doubt about the profound threat that white supremacy poses to us all, we'd best be ready to willing grasp it now. White supremacy is not a thing of the past and it's not merely the domain of extremists. It has also been a central guiding principle of Western foreign policy for almost a century. To those who claim that so-called Islamic extremism is the greatest threat to world peace today, we would do well to respond that the US military has invaded, occupied and/or bombed 14 Muslim-majority countries since 1980 -- and this excludes coups against democratically elected governments, torture, and imprisonment of Muslims with no charges. Racism and Islamophobia inform our nation's military interventions in ways that are obvious to most of the world, even if they aren't to us. It is disingenuous to even begin to consider the issue of radical Islamic violence until we begin to reckon with the ways we wield our overwhelming military power abroad.

So, as we observe Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, where are we supposed to go from here? I would suggest that the answer, as ever, is solidarity.

Let's return to the horrid events at Temple Beth Israel in Charlottesville. As it turned out, the local police didn't show up to protect the synagogue that Shabbat -- but many community members did. The synagogue's president later noted that several non-Jews attended services as an act of solidarity -- and that at least a dozen strangers stopped by that morning asking if congregants wanted them to stand with their congregation.

Another example: Last February, when Chicago's Loop Synagogue was vandalized with broken windows and swastikas by someone who was later discovered to be a local white supremacist, the very first statement of solidarity came from the Chicago office of the Council on American Islamic Relations (CAIR). Their executive director, Ahmed Rehab, said:

Chicago's Muslim community stands in full solidarity with our Jewish brothers and sisters as they deal with the trauma of this vile act of hate. No American should have to feel vulnerable and at risk simply due to their religious affiliation.

Here's another example: last Friday, protests filled the streets of St. Louis after a white former city policeman, Jason Stockley, was found not guilty of the first-degree murder of Anthony Lamar Smith, a Black 24-year-old whom he shot to death on December 20, 2011. The St. Louis police eventually used tear gas and rubber bullets against the demonstrators. Some of the demonstrators retreated to Central Reform Congregation of St. Louis, which opened its doors to the protesters. The police actually followed them and surrounded the synagogue. During the standoff, a surge of anti-Semitic statements trended on Twitter under the hashtag #GasTheSynagogue. (Yes, this actually happened last week, though it was not widely covered by the mainstream media.)

This must be our response to white supremacy: that a threat to any one of us is a threat to all.

Just one more example: last January, a 27-year year-old man entered a mosque in Quebec City and opened fire on a room filled with Muslim worshippers, killing six men and wounding another 16. The following week, Holy Blossom Temple, a Toronto synagogue organized an action in which multifaith groups formed protective circles around at least half a dozen mosques. It was inspired by the "Ring of Peace" created by about 1,000 Muslims around an Oslo synagogue in 2015, following a string of anti-Semitic attacks in Europe by Muslim gunmen.

This must be our response to white supremacy: that a threat to any one of us is a threat to all. That we are stronger together. This is the movement we need to build.

However, even as we make this commitment to one another, we cannot assume that oppression impacts all of us equally. This point was made very powerfully in a recent blog post by Mimi Arbeit, a white Jewish educator/scientist/activist from Charlottesville, so I'll quote her directly:

Jews should be fighting Nazis. And -- at the same time -- we White-presenting White-privileged Jews need to understand that we are fighting Nazis in the US within the very real context of centuries of anti-Black racism. I have been face to face with Nazis and yes I see the swastikas and I see the anti-semitic signs and I hear the taunts and I respect the fear of the synagogue in downtown Charlottesville -- AND please believe me when I say that they are coming for Black people first. It is Black people who the Nazis are seeking out, Black neighborhoods that are being targeted, anti-Black terrorism that is being perpetrated. So. Jews need to be fighting Nazis in this moment. And. At the same time. If we are fighting Nazis expecting them to look like German anti-Semitic prototypes, we will be betraying ourselves and our comrades of color. We need to fight Nazis in the US within the context of US anti-Black racism. We need to be anti-fascist and anti-racist with every breath, with every step.

To this I would only add that when it comes to state violence, it is people of color -- particularly Black Americans -- who are primarily targeted. While white Jews understandably feel vulnerable at this particular moment, we still dwell under an "all encompassing shelter of white privilege." We will never succeed in building a true movement of solidarity unless we reckon honestly with the "very real context of centuries of anti-Black racism."

I've said a great deal about clarity here, but I don't want to underestimate in any way the challenges that lay before us. I realize this kind of "clarity" can feel brutal -- like a harsh light that reflexively causes one to close one's eyes tightly. On the other hand, I know there are many who have had their eyes wide open to these issues for quite some time now.

Either way, we can't afford to look away much longer. We can't allow ourselves the luxury to grieve over dreams lost -- particularly the ones that were really more illusions than dreams in the first place.

On Rosh Hashanah, the gates are open wide. This is the time of year we are asked to look deep within, unflinchingly, so that we might discern the right way forward. We can no longer put off the work we know we must do, no matter how daunting or overwhelming it might feel. But at the same time, we can only greet the New Year together. We cannot do it alone. Our liturgy is incorrigibly first person, plural -- today we vow to set our lives and our world right, and we will be alongside one another.

So here we are. We've just said goodbye to one horrid year. The gates are opening before us. Let's take each other's hands and walk through them together.

Shanah Tovah / Happy New Year.

Copyright, Truthout. May not be reprinted without permission.

Brant Rosen

Brant Rosen is the rabbi of Tzedek Chicago and the Midwest regional director of the American Friends Service Committee.

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On Rosh Hashanah: Recommitting to Solidarity in the Face of White Supremacy

Thursday, September 21, 2017 By Brant Rosen, Truthout | Op-Ed
  • font size decrease font size decrease font size increase font size increase font size
  • Print

This must be our response to white supremacy: that a threat to any one of us is a threat to all," writes Brant Rosen, calling for a new commitment to building solidarity-based movements in the Jewish New Year. Here, members of Holy Blossom Temple, a Toronto Synagogue, form a protective circle around the Imdadul Mosque in North York in Canada on February 3, 2017, following an Islamophobic attack on a mosque in Quebec City that left six Muslim worshippers dead and nineteen wounded. (Photo: Bernard Weil / Toronto Star via Getty Images)"This must be our response to white supremacy: that a threat to any one of us is a threat to all," writes Brant Rosen, calling for a new commitment to building solidarity-based movements in the Jewish New Year. Here, members of Holy Blossom Temple, a Toronto Synagogue, form a protective circle around the Imdadul Mosque in North York in Canada on February 3, 2017, following an Islamophobic attack on a mosque in Quebec City. (Photo: Bernard Weil / Toronto Star via Getty Images)

When Temple Beth Israel -- a large Reform synagogue in downtown Charlottesville, Virginia -- opened for Shabbat morning services on August 12, 2017, its congregants had ample reason to be terrified. Prior to the "Unite the Right" rally held in town by white supremacists and neo-Nazis that weekend, some neo-Nazi websites had posted calls to burn down their synagogue.

The members of Beth Israel decided to go ahead with services, but they removed their Torah scrolls just to be safe. When services began, they noticed three men dressed in fatigues and armed with semi-automatic rifles standing across the street from their synagogue. Throughout the morning, growing numbers of neo-Nazis gathered outside their building. Worshippers heard people shouting, "There's the synagogue!" and chanting, "Sieg Heil!" At the end of services, they had to leave in groups through a side door.

Of course, this story did not occur in a vacuum. It was but a part of a larger outrage that unfolded in Charlottesville that day, and part of a still larger outrage has been unfolding in our country since November. I think it's safe to say that many Americans have learned some very hard truths about their country since the elections last fall. Many -- particularly white liberals -- are asking out loud: Where did all of this come from? Didn't we make so much progress during the Obama years? Can there really be that many people in this country who would vote for an out-and-out xenophobe who unabashedly encourages white supremacists as his political base? Is this really America?

Yes, this is America. White supremacy -- something many assumed was relegated to an ignoble period of American history -- is, and has always been, very real in this country. White supremacists and neo-Nazis are in the streets -- and they are being emboldened and encouraged by the president of the United States.

While this new political landscape may feel surreal, I'd suggest that this is actually a clarifying moment. Aspects of our national life that have remained subterranean for far too long are now being brought out into the light. We are now being brought face to face with systems and forces that many of us assumed were long dead; that we either couldn't see or chose not to see. Following the election of Trump many have commented that it feels like we are living through a bad dream. I would claim the opposite. I would say that many of us are finally waking up to real life -- a reality that, particularly for the most marginalized among us, never went away.

It is certainly a profoundly clarifying moment for American Jews. With this resurgence of white supremacist anti-Semitism, it would have been reasonable to expect a deafening outcry from the American Jewish establishment. But that, in fact, has not been the case. When Trump appointed white nationalist Steve Bannon to a senior White House position, there was nary an outcry from mainstream Jewish organizations. The Zionist Organization of America actually invited Bannon to speak at its annual gala.

Why would the Israeli Prime Minister call a president who panders to anti-Semitic white supremacists "brave" and "courageous?" Because Trump pledged his support to Israel.

Israel's response to this political moment is no less illuminating. During a huge spike in anti-Semitic vandalism and threats against Jewish institutions immediately after the elections, it wasn't only Trump that had to be goaded into making a statement -- the Israeli government itself remained shockingly silent. This same government that never misses an opportunity to condemn anti-Semitic acts by Muslim extremists seemed utterly unperturbed that over 100 Jewish institutions had received bomb threats or that Jewish cemeteries were desecrated across the country. (More than 500 headstones were knocked down at one Jewish cemetery alone in Philadelphia.) And when neo-Nazis with tiki torches rallied in Charlottesville proclaiming "Jews will not replace us," it took Prime Minister Netanyahu three days to respond with a mild tweet. Israel's Diaspora Minister Naftali Bennett, whom one would assume should be concerned with anti-Semitism anywhere in the Diaspora, had this to say:

We view ourselves as having a certain degree of responsibility for every Jew in the world, just for being Jewish, but ultimately it's the responsibility of the sovereign nation to defend its citizens.

This is a clarifying moment if ever there was one. Support for Israel and its policies trumps everything -- yes, including white supremacist Jew hatred. Just this week, Prime Minister Netanyahu said this about Trump's speech at the UN:

I've been ambassador to the United Nations, and I'm a long-serving Israeli prime minister, so I've listened to countless speeches in this hall. But I can say this -- none were bolder, none were more courageous and forthright than the one delivered by President Trump today.

Why would the Israeli Prime Minister call a president who panders to anti-Semitic white supremacists "brave" and "courageous?" Because Trump pledged his support to Israel. Because he called the Iran nuclear deal an "embarrassment." Because he vowed American support to allies who are "working together throughout the Middle East to crush the loser terrorists."

Historically speaking, this is not the first time that Zionists have cozied up to anti-Semites in order to gain their political support. Zionism has long depended on anti-Semites to validate its very existence. This Faustian bargain was struck as far back as the 19th century, when Zionist leader Theodor Herzl met with the Russian minister of the interior Vyacheslav von Plehve, an infamous anti-Semite who encouraged the Kishinev pogroms that very same year. Plehve pledged that as long as the Zionists encouraged emigration of Jews from Russia, the Russian authorities would not disturb them.

It makes perfect sense that Israeli leaders are loath to condemn the rise of white supremacy. After all, they have a different enemy they want to sell to us.

This Zionist strategy was also central to the diplomatic process that led to the 1917 Balfour Declaration, in which British Foreign Secretary Arthur Balfour announced his government's support for "the establishment of a national home in Palestine for the Jewish people." Although Balfour has long been lionized as a Zionist hero, he wasn't particularly well known for his love for Jews or the Jewish people. When he was prime minister, his government passed the 1905 Aliens Act, severely restricting immigration at a time in which persecuted Jews were emigrating from Eastern Europe. At the time, Balfour spoke of the "undoubted evils which had fallen on the country from an alien immigration which was largely Jewish." Balfour, like many Christians of his class, "did not believe that Jews could be assimilated into Gentile British society."

When you think about it, it makes perfect sense that Israeli leaders are loath to condemn the rise of white supremacy. After all, they have a different enemy they want to sell to us. They want us to buy their Islamophobic narrative that "radical Muslim extremism" is the most serious threat to the world today. And you can be sure they view Palestinians as an integral part of this threat.

We cannot underestimate how important this narrative is to Israel's foreign policy -- indeed, to its own sense of validation in the international community. Netanyahu is so committed to this idea, in fact, that two years ago he actually went as far as to blame Palestinians for starting the Holocaust itself. In a speech to the Zionist Congress, he claimed that in 1941, the Palestinian Grand Mufti convinced Hitler to launch a campaign of extermination against European Jewry at a time when Hitler only wanted to expel them. This ludicrous historical falsehood was so over the top that a German government spokesperson eventually released a statement that essentially said, "No, that's not true. Actually, the Holocaust was our fault."

Meanwhile, Netanyahu is pursuing an alliance with the anti-Semitic populist Prime Minister of Hungary, Viktor Orbán. When Netanyahu recently traveled to Hungary to meet with Orbán, leaders of the Hungarian Jewish community publicly criticized Netanyahu, accusing him of "betrayal."

If there was ever any doubt about the profound threat that white supremacy poses to us all, we'd best be ready to willing grasp it now. White supremacy is not a thing of the past and it's not merely the domain of extremists. It has also been a central guiding principle of Western foreign policy for almost a century. To those who claim that so-called Islamic extremism is the greatest threat to world peace today, we would do well to respond that the US military has invaded, occupied and/or bombed 14 Muslim-majority countries since 1980 -- and this excludes coups against democratically elected governments, torture, and imprisonment of Muslims with no charges. Racism and Islamophobia inform our nation's military interventions in ways that are obvious to most of the world, even if they aren't to us. It is disingenuous to even begin to consider the issue of radical Islamic violence until we begin to reckon with the ways we wield our overwhelming military power abroad.

So, as we observe Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, where are we supposed to go from here? I would suggest that the answer, as ever, is solidarity.

Let's return to the horrid events at Temple Beth Israel in Charlottesville. As it turned out, the local police didn't show up to protect the synagogue that Shabbat -- but many community members did. The synagogue's president later noted that several non-Jews attended services as an act of solidarity -- and that at least a dozen strangers stopped by that morning asking if congregants wanted them to stand with their congregation.

Another example: Last February, when Chicago's Loop Synagogue was vandalized with broken windows and swastikas by someone who was later discovered to be a local white supremacist, the very first statement of solidarity came from the Chicago office of the Council on American Islamic Relations (CAIR). Their executive director, Ahmed Rehab, said:

Chicago's Muslim community stands in full solidarity with our Jewish brothers and sisters as they deal with the trauma of this vile act of hate. No American should have to feel vulnerable and at risk simply due to their religious affiliation.

Here's another example: last Friday, protests filled the streets of St. Louis after a white former city policeman, Jason Stockley, was found not guilty of the first-degree murder of Anthony Lamar Smith, a Black 24-year-old whom he shot to death on December 20, 2011. The St. Louis police eventually used tear gas and rubber bullets against the demonstrators. Some of the demonstrators retreated to Central Reform Congregation of St. Louis, which opened its doors to the protesters. The police actually followed them and surrounded the synagogue. During the standoff, a surge of anti-Semitic statements trended on Twitter under the hashtag #GasTheSynagogue. (Yes, this actually happened last week, though it was not widely covered by the mainstream media.)

This must be our response to white supremacy: that a threat to any one of us is a threat to all.

Just one more example: last January, a 27-year year-old man entered a mosque in Quebec City and opened fire on a room filled with Muslim worshippers, killing six men and wounding another 16. The following week, Holy Blossom Temple, a Toronto synagogue organized an action in which multifaith groups formed protective circles around at least half a dozen mosques. It was inspired by the "Ring of Peace" created by about 1,000 Muslims around an Oslo synagogue in 2015, following a string of anti-Semitic attacks in Europe by Muslim gunmen.

This must be our response to white supremacy: that a threat to any one of us is a threat to all. That we are stronger together. This is the movement we need to build.

However, even as we make this commitment to one another, we cannot assume that oppression impacts all of us equally. This point was made very powerfully in a recent blog post by Mimi Arbeit, a white Jewish educator/scientist/activist from Charlottesville, so I'll quote her directly:

Jews should be fighting Nazis. And -- at the same time -- we White-presenting White-privileged Jews need to understand that we are fighting Nazis in the US within the very real context of centuries of anti-Black racism. I have been face to face with Nazis and yes I see the swastikas and I see the anti-semitic signs and I hear the taunts and I respect the fear of the synagogue in downtown Charlottesville -- AND please believe me when I say that they are coming for Black people first. It is Black people who the Nazis are seeking out, Black neighborhoods that are being targeted, anti-Black terrorism that is being perpetrated. So. Jews need to be fighting Nazis in this moment. And. At the same time. If we are fighting Nazis expecting them to look like German anti-Semitic prototypes, we will be betraying ourselves and our comrades of color. We need to fight Nazis in the US within the context of US anti-Black racism. We need to be anti-fascist and anti-racist with every breath, with every step.

To this I would only add that when it comes to state violence, it is people of color -- particularly Black Americans -- who are primarily targeted. While white Jews understandably feel vulnerable at this particular moment, we still dwell under an "all encompassing shelter of white privilege." We will never succeed in building a true movement of solidarity unless we reckon honestly with the "very real context of centuries of anti-Black racism."

I've said a great deal about clarity here, but I don't want to underestimate in any way the challenges that lay before us. I realize this kind of "clarity" can feel brutal -- like a harsh light that reflexively causes one to close one's eyes tightly. On the other hand, I know there are many who have had their eyes wide open to these issues for quite some time now.

Either way, we can't afford to look away much longer. We can't allow ourselves the luxury to grieve over dreams lost -- particularly the ones that were really more illusions than dreams in the first place.

On Rosh Hashanah, the gates are open wide. This is the time of year we are asked to look deep within, unflinchingly, so that we might discern the right way forward. We can no longer put off the work we know we must do, no matter how daunting or overwhelming it might feel. But at the same time, we can only greet the New Year together. We cannot do it alone. Our liturgy is incorrigibly first person, plural -- today we vow to set our lives and our world right, and we will be alongside one another.

So here we are. We've just said goodbye to one horrid year. The gates are opening before us. Let's take each other's hands and walk through them together.

Shanah Tovah / Happy New Year.

Copyright, Truthout. May not be reprinted without permission.

Brant Rosen

Brant Rosen is the rabbi of Tzedek Chicago and the Midwest regional director of the American Friends Service Committee.