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Julie Doucet: How Does It Feel to Be Placed Among the Comic Greats?

Tuesday, February 14, 2012 By Aidan Koch and Anne Elizabeth Moore, Truthout | Graphic Journalism
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This week in "Ladydrawers" (catch up here), we have the third installment of our interview with one of the most important and talented female artists in North America - Julie Doucet. As she told us in the first segment, she left the comics industry after 12 years not because she was forced out for any visible acts of sexism, but because of what she called the "all-boys crowd," and personal jealousies had become a drain. In our second strip, Doucet touched on the economic issues of comics and her own fame. In this segment, she talks about her role as a feminist icon and her decision to represent young women's self-destruction and sexuality to a mostly male audience.

To see past "Ladydrawers" comics, click here.

Click here or on the comic below to open it in a new window and click again to zoom in.Ladydrawers

Anne Elizabeth Moore

Anne Elizabeth Moore is a cultural critic and author of several award-winning, best-selling nonfiction books including Unmarketable (The New Press) and Cambodian Grrrl (Cantankerous Titles). She is a Fulbright scholar, a USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism Fellow, and is the recipient of a 2016 Write A House Fellowship in Detroit. Her work has appeared in The Baffler, Al Jazeera, Salon, The Onion, Talking Points Memo, Wilson Quarterly, Tin House, and in international art exhibitions, including the Whitney Biennial and a solo show at the MCA Chicago. She has appeared on CNN, NPR, Voice of America, and in The New York Times, among others. Her most recent book, from Curbside Splendor, is Body Horror: Capitalism, Fear, Misogyny, Jokes.

Aidan Koch

Aidan Koch is an artist currently working out of Portland, OR. Her first graphic novella, The Whale was released in October 2010. She is currently scheming up new books, playing music non-stop, and setting forth for wild adventures.
www.aidankoch.com

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Julie Doucet: It's Amazing I'm Able to Make a Living
By Aidan Koch, Anne Elizabeth Moore, Truthout | Graphic Journalism
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Julie Doucet: How Does It Feel to Be Placed Among the Comic Greats?

Tuesday, February 14, 2012 By Aidan Koch and Anne Elizabeth Moore, Truthout | Graphic Journalism
  • font size decrease font size decrease font size increase font size increase font size
  • Print

This week in "Ladydrawers" (catch up here), we have the third installment of our interview with one of the most important and talented female artists in North America - Julie Doucet. As she told us in the first segment, she left the comics industry after 12 years not because she was forced out for any visible acts of sexism, but because of what she called the "all-boys crowd," and personal jealousies had become a drain. In our second strip, Doucet touched on the economic issues of comics and her own fame. In this segment, she talks about her role as a feminist icon and her decision to represent young women's self-destruction and sexuality to a mostly male audience.

To see past "Ladydrawers" comics, click here.

Click here or on the comic below to open it in a new window and click again to zoom in.Ladydrawers

Anne Elizabeth Moore

Anne Elizabeth Moore is a cultural critic and author of several award-winning, best-selling nonfiction books including Unmarketable (The New Press) and Cambodian Grrrl (Cantankerous Titles). She is a Fulbright scholar, a USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism Fellow, and is the recipient of a 2016 Write A House Fellowship in Detroit. Her work has appeared in The Baffler, Al Jazeera, Salon, The Onion, Talking Points Memo, Wilson Quarterly, Tin House, and in international art exhibitions, including the Whitney Biennial and a solo show at the MCA Chicago. She has appeared on CNN, NPR, Voice of America, and in The New York Times, among others. Her most recent book, from Curbside Splendor, is Body Horror: Capitalism, Fear, Misogyny, Jokes.

Aidan Koch

Aidan Koch is an artist currently working out of Portland, OR. Her first graphic novella, The Whale was released in October 2010. She is currently scheming up new books, playing music non-stop, and setting forth for wild adventures.
www.aidankoch.com

Related Stories

Julie Doucet: It's Amazing I'm Able to Make a Living
By Aidan Koch, Anne Elizabeth Moore, Truthout | Graphic Journalism