Thursday, 28 July 2016 / TRUTH-OUT.ORG

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Speakout

Speakout is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. Speakout articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

Jul 27

Breaking Ground at Cinema Hebron

By Brant Rosen, Shalom Rav | Op-Ed

Virtually every Palestinian shop in H2 has been closed and their doors welded shut by the army. Because the Palestinian residents of Shuhadah St. are not allowed to walk on the road, they must enter and exit through the rear of homes because they cannot leave their own front doors. Because of these measures -- and the ongoing harassment and violence at the hands of Jewish settlers -- what was once the busting commercial center of Hebron has become a ghost town. 42% of its Palestinian homes are empty and 70% of its Palestinian business have been shut down.

I woke up yesterday hungry. Since my last shopping trip four days before, I'd not eaten much, saving most of the food for my younger daughter, who is two. I also woke up with a bank account that was overdrawn, and was waiting on a paycheck that was a week overdue. My diet is small and not varied compared to what my daughters eat. While I subsist off of eggs, chicken, frozen veggies, hummus, and apples with nut butters, they eat an assortment of fresh fruit. I love waking up and making them pancakes and bacon, cutting up strawberries and plums, and setting the table to watch them eat.

In the aftermath of the ISIS-claimed attack in Nice, France, that killed more than 80 people and wounded over 200 more, former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich proposed a solution: "We should frankly test every person here who is of a Muslim background, and if they believe in Sharia, they should be deported." By Sharia, Gingrich is apparently referring to a diverse body of Islamic prescriptions that cover personal, group and state behavior which vary according to region and scholar.

Stories are a powerful mechanism for social change; entire nations are built and maintained by stories and sharing stories is a way of building community, of shaping identity and constructing meaning. However, the stories and voices of people directly impacted by the criminal punishment system, are routinely excluded from policy and reform efforts. This exclusion is the opening to create alternative sites to bridge understanding, knowledge production and impact public and penal policy.

Alton Sterling and Philando Castile are yet another set of names we won't forget. The consequent polarity of media representation regarding isolated events threatens to intercept an honest conversation about the institutional bias of law enforcement. The pattern is at once endemic and global. Here is a list of 14 movies that have sought to illuminate the deeper problem with police, racism and systemic abuse -- on a global scale.

Two former Guantánamo prisoners were convicted in Belgium by the Brussels Criminal Court on Monday, July 18, 2016, one on terrorism-related charges. The two men, Moussa Zemmouri, 38, a Belgian national, and Soufiane Abbar Huwari, 46, an Algerian national, were arrested on July 23, 2015. Huwari was arrested with three other men during an attempted armed burglary in Hoboken, near the city of Antwerp, where Zemmouri lives.

The current attempt to remove President Dilma Rousseff of Brazil bears many resemblances to the Clinton impeachment episode. It is led by a group of politicians who seek to overturn the results of national elections and steer the nation in a different, right-wing direction; and the elected president has not committed an impeachable offense. Missing, of course, is the sex scandal -- and the charges are so unsexy that most people don't even know what the president is being impeached for, and it's not that easy to figure it out.

Tweeting as @xychelsea, her Twitter bio describes her as a "Former Intelligence Analyst. Trans Woman. Prisoner." Chelsea Manning became the most famous prisoner on social media after she was sentenced to 35 years in Leavenworth military prison for leaking some 750,000 classified documents. Manning tweets by proxy -- meaning she relays her thoughts via voice phone to representatives who maintain her Twitter account from beyond prison walls. 

Jul 21

The Role of Collective Memory in Collective Action

By Stephanie Farquhar and Erin Crosby , Speakout | Op-Ed

For many Dallasites, the murder of five police officers in downtown Dallas brought about memories of JFK's assassination just blocks from where a lone gunman shot 11 officers. This tragedy brings to mind another violent event from the city's history, the 1910 public lynching of Allen Brooks at the Old Red Courthouse. Brooks was pulled from a second-story courtroom with a rope around his neck, his dead body dragged down Main Street to be hung for display at the Elks Arch, a symbolic gateway to the city. It was a gruesome path across the same streets trod in a July 7 protest. You see, Dallas is plagued by racial injustice. Our ability to collectively suppress the memory of injustice leaves us confused and searching for answers when racism confronts us in disturbing and violent ways. 

In her essay, "The Myths of Black Lives Matter," published in The Wall Street Journal, Heather Mac Donald writes that "fatal police shootings make up a much larger proportion of white and Hispanic homicide deaths than black homicide deaths." Citing The Washington Post database of police shootings, Mac Donald reports that "officers killed 662 whites and Hispanics and 258 blacks" in 2015. That means that 28 percent of those killed by the police in 2015 were Black.

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Speakout

Speakout is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. Speakout articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

Jul 27

Breaking Ground at Cinema Hebron

By Brant Rosen, Shalom Rav | Op-Ed

Virtually every Palestinian shop in H2 has been closed and their doors welded shut by the army. Because the Palestinian residents of Shuhadah St. are not allowed to walk on the road, they must enter and exit through the rear of homes because they cannot leave their own front doors. Because of these measures -- and the ongoing harassment and violence at the hands of Jewish settlers -- what was once the busting commercial center of Hebron has become a ghost town. 42% of its Palestinian homes are empty and 70% of its Palestinian business have been shut down.

I woke up yesterday hungry. Since my last shopping trip four days before, I'd not eaten much, saving most of the food for my younger daughter, who is two. I also woke up with a bank account that was overdrawn, and was waiting on a paycheck that was a week overdue. My diet is small and not varied compared to what my daughters eat. While I subsist off of eggs, chicken, frozen veggies, hummus, and apples with nut butters, they eat an assortment of fresh fruit. I love waking up and making them pancakes and bacon, cutting up strawberries and plums, and setting the table to watch them eat.

In the aftermath of the ISIS-claimed attack in Nice, France, that killed more than 80 people and wounded over 200 more, former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich proposed a solution: "We should frankly test every person here who is of a Muslim background, and if they believe in Sharia, they should be deported." By Sharia, Gingrich is apparently referring to a diverse body of Islamic prescriptions that cover personal, group and state behavior which vary according to region and scholar.

Stories are a powerful mechanism for social change; entire nations are built and maintained by stories and sharing stories is a way of building community, of shaping identity and constructing meaning. However, the stories and voices of people directly impacted by the criminal punishment system, are routinely excluded from policy and reform efforts. This exclusion is the opening to create alternative sites to bridge understanding, knowledge production and impact public and penal policy.

Alton Sterling and Philando Castile are yet another set of names we won't forget. The consequent polarity of media representation regarding isolated events threatens to intercept an honest conversation about the institutional bias of law enforcement. The pattern is at once endemic and global. Here is a list of 14 movies that have sought to illuminate the deeper problem with police, racism and systemic abuse -- on a global scale.

Two former Guantánamo prisoners were convicted in Belgium by the Brussels Criminal Court on Monday, July 18, 2016, one on terrorism-related charges. The two men, Moussa Zemmouri, 38, a Belgian national, and Soufiane Abbar Huwari, 46, an Algerian national, were arrested on July 23, 2015. Huwari was arrested with three other men during an attempted armed burglary in Hoboken, near the city of Antwerp, where Zemmouri lives.

The current attempt to remove President Dilma Rousseff of Brazil bears many resemblances to the Clinton impeachment episode. It is led by a group of politicians who seek to overturn the results of national elections and steer the nation in a different, right-wing direction; and the elected president has not committed an impeachable offense. Missing, of course, is the sex scandal -- and the charges are so unsexy that most people don't even know what the president is being impeached for, and it's not that easy to figure it out.

Tweeting as @xychelsea, her Twitter bio describes her as a "Former Intelligence Analyst. Trans Woman. Prisoner." Chelsea Manning became the most famous prisoner on social media after she was sentenced to 35 years in Leavenworth military prison for leaking some 750,000 classified documents. Manning tweets by proxy -- meaning she relays her thoughts via voice phone to representatives who maintain her Twitter account from beyond prison walls. 

Jul 21

The Role of Collective Memory in Collective Action

By Stephanie Farquhar and Erin Crosby , Speakout | Op-Ed

For many Dallasites, the murder of five police officers in downtown Dallas brought about memories of JFK's assassination just blocks from where a lone gunman shot 11 officers. This tragedy brings to mind another violent event from the city's history, the 1910 public lynching of Allen Brooks at the Old Red Courthouse. Brooks was pulled from a second-story courtroom with a rope around his neck, his dead body dragged down Main Street to be hung for display at the Elks Arch, a symbolic gateway to the city. It was a gruesome path across the same streets trod in a July 7 protest. You see, Dallas is plagued by racial injustice. Our ability to collectively suppress the memory of injustice leaves us confused and searching for answers when racism confronts us in disturbing and violent ways. 

In her essay, "The Myths of Black Lives Matter," published in The Wall Street Journal, Heather Mac Donald writes that "fatal police shootings make up a much larger proportion of white and Hispanic homicide deaths than black homicide deaths." Citing The Washington Post database of police shootings, Mac Donald reports that "officers killed 662 whites and Hispanics and 258 blacks" in 2015. That means that 28 percent of those killed by the police in 2015 were Black.