Monday, 22 September 2014 / TRUTH-OUT.ORG

Speakout

SpeakOut is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. SpeakOut articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

Unless you’re the churchgoing type, there’s not much sense in driving through the Mississippi Delta on a Sunday morning. Folks tend to take the sabbath pretty seriously around these parts, and a visitor who so happens to be passing through is pretty well guaranteed to have one hell of a time trying to find a restaurant, store or museum that was open for business. At least, that was my experience when I crossed over the border from southern Arkansas to Mississippi last summer. Turns out that down in the Delta, Sunday is most certainly the lord’s day and the only proper thing for a person to do on the lord’s day is to get to worshipping. There was a pretty big part of me that felt the urge to attend a service at a good old fashioned, hole in the wall Southern Baptist or Methodist church, but I couldn’t pick up the nerve to do it. Had there been one of those big non-denominational mega churches around I would have felt alright just showing up more or less as a voyeur because anonymity is kind of the whole point of a their existence. When your main chapel has stadium style seating that can hold several thousand congregants, it’s entirely possible to go to church every Sunday for a year and never really have any contact with anybody else there. But if I were to roll up to tiny AME church of 100 people in rural Mississippi and go there for the express purpose of observing their religious rituals, I’d feel like I was intruding on something private and actually, you know, sacred. It’s kind of like peeing in a swimming pool as opposed to peeing in an ocean; you’re doing the same thing in both cases, but folks will only notice in one of them.

On July 18th, over two thousand protesters marching through downtown Detroit succeeded in forcing the city to put a 15 day moratorium on water shut-offs; a respite that was later extended to Sunday, August 24th.

Today, August 25th, as the moratorium ends.  The city will resume cutting off elderly, low income and retired or disabled citizens who cannot afford to pay their bills.

Lawyers and activists in Detroit are fighting to keep the city Emergency Management from withholding city water to strapped residents.

There are tens of millions of people in the United States who completely reject the theory of evolution and believe that humans were created more or less in their current form in the recent past. Similarly, there are many people who completely reject modern economics and insist that countries cannot suffer due to a lack of demand. In their creationist economics view, the main reason that economies experience economic stagnation is government protections for ordinary workers. These economic creationists apparently control reporting on the French economy in the New York Times.

piece headlined "France acknowledges economic malaise, blames austerity," effectively dismisses the idea that the economic malaise actually is attributable to austerity as a large body of economic research would suggest. While it does note that there is reason for believing that austerity has contributed to slow growth it concludes by telling readers that the real problem is France's rigid labor market.

Sometimes, amid the heated political debate about what should done by the U.S. government in world affairs, a proposal cuts through the TV babble of the supposed experts with a clear, useful suggestion.

That proposal came on August 17, when Pope Francis told journalists how he thought the world should cope with the challenge posed by ISIS, the Islamic militant group engaged in murderous behavior in Syria and Iraq. "One nation alone cannot judge how you stop this," he said, in an apparent reference to U.S. action against ISIS crimes. Instead, the United Nations is the proper forum to "discuss 'Is there an unjust aggression'" and "'How should we stop it?' Just this. Nothing more."

Aug 26

COSMOLOGY 101

By Emanuel E. Garcia, SpeakOut | Poetry

We claim that an infinity
Can come from one

That nothing is more virtual
Than empty space

Aug 26

Ferguson Is All of Us

By Dr James J Zogby, Arab American Institute | Op-Ed

This is the year in which we celebrated the 50th Anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Bill. Instead of being able to reflect on the distance we have traveled since 1964, the horrific events unfolding in Ferguson, Missouri only served to remind us of how far we still have to go.

It's not just the thought of Michael Brown lying dead in the street with six bullets in his young body. It's not just the scene of police in armored vehicles, dressed in battle fatigues, military issue helmets, and gas masks staring down demonstrators through the gun-sights of their high-powered weapons. It is that. But it is so much more.

Aug 25

The Rebirth of the West

By Werner de Gruijter, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

Why even economists will take ethical issues seriously…

Scientists are pushing the panic button. Since it is reasonable to assume the advent of more humanitarian misery due to increased wealth differences. Yet nothing happens to prevent this; mainly because ethical language has lost its popularity among politicians, especially when the economy is concerned. Hence this attempt to revitalize the ethical argument.

My earliest recognition of the odious and oppressive role of racism in American life came in December 1955. No, it was not in response to the arrest of Rosa Parks for refusing to give up her seat on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama and the subsequent mobilization and bus boycott by the black community of that city. Unaware of those developments, I was, instead, attuned to the controversy surrounding the efforts by Southerners, from the governor of Georgia to the residents of New Orleans, to exclude the University of Pittsburgh's black fullback and linebacker, Bobby Grier, from playing in the Sugar Bowl game against Georgia Tech.

Growing up in western Pennsylvania where football was integral to masculine rites-of-passage, I was outraged that racial discrimination could bar a talented athlete from performing on the gridiron. I was also a naïve 10 year-old, living in a predominantly white suburb of Pittsburgh and sheltered in so many ways within a racial order that provided certain advantages to whites while denying them to blacks. When I got to junior high school, I was eager to join the football team even though my skinny frame limited my eventual playing time. Although I transitioned from football to cross-country and track in high school, I remained an avid fan of the game and continued to take part in pick-up touch football matches.

Santa Barbara –The Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) yesterday continued its efforts to compel the United States government to comply with its obligations under the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), asking a Federal Court judge to reject the US government’s claim that the treaty cannot be enforced.

On April 24, 2014, the Marshall Islands filed a lawsuit in US Federal Court, alleging the United States has violated its moral and legal obligations under the NPT by refusing to negotiate in good faith toward complete nuclear disarmament.

Aug 25

Ferguson: Apartheid-Town America

By Rev. Samuel Weddington, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

Milkor is a company few Americans recognize. Milkor USA, Inc. is an American majority-owned company spun off from its South African parent company, Milkor (PTY) Ltd. Both companies manufacture and sell the Multiple Grenade Launcher (MGL). Primarily developed for military use, the MGL is basically a portable cannon with a six-slot revolver mechanism on the bottom that has a variety of uses and configurations ranging from the launch of mobile 40mm grenades to tear-gas canisters. This weapon is terrifying, and rightly so since it is the "grenade launcher of choice" for the United States Marine Corps and the Navy Seals. Unfortunately, the MGL is now present on American streets like West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson, with officers in police departments across America wielding them against a public they are sworn to serve. Such trivia is important because we, as a country, must come to the realization that our police forces are militarized - emphasis on enforcement rather than service to peace - and the weapon of choice to suppress the rights of our citizens to protest has its roots in apartheid South Africa.

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Speakout

SpeakOut is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. SpeakOut articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

Unless you’re the churchgoing type, there’s not much sense in driving through the Mississippi Delta on a Sunday morning. Folks tend to take the sabbath pretty seriously around these parts, and a visitor who so happens to be passing through is pretty well guaranteed to have one hell of a time trying to find a restaurant, store or museum that was open for business. At least, that was my experience when I crossed over the border from southern Arkansas to Mississippi last summer. Turns out that down in the Delta, Sunday is most certainly the lord’s day and the only proper thing for a person to do on the lord’s day is to get to worshipping. There was a pretty big part of me that felt the urge to attend a service at a good old fashioned, hole in the wall Southern Baptist or Methodist church, but I couldn’t pick up the nerve to do it. Had there been one of those big non-denominational mega churches around I would have felt alright just showing up more or less as a voyeur because anonymity is kind of the whole point of a their existence. When your main chapel has stadium style seating that can hold several thousand congregants, it’s entirely possible to go to church every Sunday for a year and never really have any contact with anybody else there. But if I were to roll up to tiny AME church of 100 people in rural Mississippi and go there for the express purpose of observing their religious rituals, I’d feel like I was intruding on something private and actually, you know, sacred. It’s kind of like peeing in a swimming pool as opposed to peeing in an ocean; you’re doing the same thing in both cases, but folks will only notice in one of them.

On July 18th, over two thousand protesters marching through downtown Detroit succeeded in forcing the city to put a 15 day moratorium on water shut-offs; a respite that was later extended to Sunday, August 24th.

Today, August 25th, as the moratorium ends.  The city will resume cutting off elderly, low income and retired or disabled citizens who cannot afford to pay their bills.

Lawyers and activists in Detroit are fighting to keep the city Emergency Management from withholding city water to strapped residents.

There are tens of millions of people in the United States who completely reject the theory of evolution and believe that humans were created more or less in their current form in the recent past. Similarly, there are many people who completely reject modern economics and insist that countries cannot suffer due to a lack of demand. In their creationist economics view, the main reason that economies experience economic stagnation is government protections for ordinary workers. These economic creationists apparently control reporting on the French economy in the New York Times.

piece headlined "France acknowledges economic malaise, blames austerity," effectively dismisses the idea that the economic malaise actually is attributable to austerity as a large body of economic research would suggest. While it does note that there is reason for believing that austerity has contributed to slow growth it concludes by telling readers that the real problem is France's rigid labor market.

Sometimes, amid the heated political debate about what should done by the U.S. government in world affairs, a proposal cuts through the TV babble of the supposed experts with a clear, useful suggestion.

That proposal came on August 17, when Pope Francis told journalists how he thought the world should cope with the challenge posed by ISIS, the Islamic militant group engaged in murderous behavior in Syria and Iraq. "One nation alone cannot judge how you stop this," he said, in an apparent reference to U.S. action against ISIS crimes. Instead, the United Nations is the proper forum to "discuss 'Is there an unjust aggression'" and "'How should we stop it?' Just this. Nothing more."

Aug 26

COSMOLOGY 101

By Emanuel E. Garcia, SpeakOut | Poetry

We claim that an infinity
Can come from one

That nothing is more virtual
Than empty space

Aug 26

Ferguson Is All of Us

By Dr James J Zogby, Arab American Institute | Op-Ed

This is the year in which we celebrated the 50th Anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Bill. Instead of being able to reflect on the distance we have traveled since 1964, the horrific events unfolding in Ferguson, Missouri only served to remind us of how far we still have to go.

It's not just the thought of Michael Brown lying dead in the street with six bullets in his young body. It's not just the scene of police in armored vehicles, dressed in battle fatigues, military issue helmets, and gas masks staring down demonstrators through the gun-sights of their high-powered weapons. It is that. But it is so much more.

Aug 25

The Rebirth of the West

By Werner de Gruijter, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

Why even economists will take ethical issues seriously…

Scientists are pushing the panic button. Since it is reasonable to assume the advent of more humanitarian misery due to increased wealth differences. Yet nothing happens to prevent this; mainly because ethical language has lost its popularity among politicians, especially when the economy is concerned. Hence this attempt to revitalize the ethical argument.

My earliest recognition of the odious and oppressive role of racism in American life came in December 1955. No, it was not in response to the arrest of Rosa Parks for refusing to give up her seat on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama and the subsequent mobilization and bus boycott by the black community of that city. Unaware of those developments, I was, instead, attuned to the controversy surrounding the efforts by Southerners, from the governor of Georgia to the residents of New Orleans, to exclude the University of Pittsburgh's black fullback and linebacker, Bobby Grier, from playing in the Sugar Bowl game against Georgia Tech.

Growing up in western Pennsylvania where football was integral to masculine rites-of-passage, I was outraged that racial discrimination could bar a talented athlete from performing on the gridiron. I was also a naïve 10 year-old, living in a predominantly white suburb of Pittsburgh and sheltered in so many ways within a racial order that provided certain advantages to whites while denying them to blacks. When I got to junior high school, I was eager to join the football team even though my skinny frame limited my eventual playing time. Although I transitioned from football to cross-country and track in high school, I remained an avid fan of the game and continued to take part in pick-up touch football matches.

Santa Barbara –The Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) yesterday continued its efforts to compel the United States government to comply with its obligations under the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), asking a Federal Court judge to reject the US government’s claim that the treaty cannot be enforced.

On April 24, 2014, the Marshall Islands filed a lawsuit in US Federal Court, alleging the United States has violated its moral and legal obligations under the NPT by refusing to negotiate in good faith toward complete nuclear disarmament.

Aug 25

Ferguson: Apartheid-Town America

By Rev. Samuel Weddington, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

Milkor is a company few Americans recognize. Milkor USA, Inc. is an American majority-owned company spun off from its South African parent company, Milkor (PTY) Ltd. Both companies manufacture and sell the Multiple Grenade Launcher (MGL). Primarily developed for military use, the MGL is basically a portable cannon with a six-slot revolver mechanism on the bottom that has a variety of uses and configurations ranging from the launch of mobile 40mm grenades to tear-gas canisters. This weapon is terrifying, and rightly so since it is the "grenade launcher of choice" for the United States Marine Corps and the Navy Seals. Unfortunately, the MGL is now present on American streets like West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson, with officers in police departments across America wielding them against a public they are sworn to serve. Such trivia is important because we, as a country, must come to the realization that our police forces are militarized - emphasis on enforcement rather than service to peace - and the weapon of choice to suppress the rights of our citizens to protest has its roots in apartheid South Africa.