Monday, 24 November 2014 / TRUTH-OUT.ORG
  • The Craving for Democracy

    Craving real democracy, many people are unwilling to participate in an electoral game that does not provide any form of genuine popular control over decisions that affect people's well-being and freedom.

  • Tough Lessons for Rahm

    The number of black educators in Chicago's public schools dropped precipitously. With actions that disproportionately affected black teachers, that pattern continued under Mayor Rahm Emanuel.

Speakout

SpeakOut is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. SpeakOut articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

Today, for the first time since August 21, 2003, the National Labor Relations Board has a full complement of five Senate confirmed members. Four new members, all nominated by President Barack Obama and confirmed last month by the U.S. Senate have been sworn into office. NLRB Chairman Mark Gaston Pearce was also confirmed last month to an additional five year term on the Board.

"The idea of universal suspicion without individual evidence is what Americans find abhorrent and what black men in America must constantly fight. It is pervasive in policing policies — like stop-and-frisk, and . . . neighborhood watch -- regardless of the collateral damage done to the majority of innocents. It's like burning down a house to rid it of mice."

Aug 24

Audacity of Dope? Yes We Scan?

By Steven Hill, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

This president has become a tragic figure, more so every day with each new revelation of how far the surveillance state has been developed and implemented under his watch. And how far they will go -- detaining the partner of reporter Glen Greenwald, investigating other reporters, smashing the hard drives of a leading newspaper -- to intimidate journalists and editors trying to report on it. Big Brother is watching, and cracking down on those who want to reveal the King's secrets. The U.S. even has bugged European Union offices -- supposedly our allies -- and world leaders at international conferences of the G-20.

Aug 24

Bad Precedent and Bad Faith

By Lawrence Davidson, To the Point Analysis | News Analysis

Back in January of 2012 a lawsuit, organized by activist Tangerine Bolen (who also did the fundraising that made the legal effort possible) involving multiple plaintiffs including former war correspondent Christopher Hedges was filed in federal court challenging the constitutionality of the 2012 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). Specifically, the suit called into question the Act's Section 1021(b)(2), which allows for indefinite detention by the U.S. military of people "who are part of or substantially support Al Qaeda, the Taliban or associated forces engaged in hostilities against the United States." This detention denies those held of the ability to "contest the allegations against them because they have no right to be notified of the specific charges against them." In this suit filed by Hedges et al., the issue in question was the vagueness of the terms "substantially support" and "associated forces." For instance, could this vagueness lead to apprehension and detention of journalists who publish interviews with members of Al Qaeda or the Taliban? Could it lead to the same treatment against political activists protesting U.S. policies against these or "associated" groups?

Over the past months, I have been shocked and dismayed to hear the revelations by the courageous women who continue to tell their stories of sexual harassment and abuse at the hands of San Diego's Mayor Bob Filner. When I saw the four brave women speak out in a joint interview, I made a decision that I could no longer remain silent.. It is high time for men to step up and join the courageous woman on the front lines, who have been victims and survivors of Bob Filner's utter personal disregard, disrespect and degradation of women, as expressed through his unwanted sexual advances, which are at the lower end of a continuum of sexual abuse and assault.

Aug 22

Obama Vs. Snowden: Parsing the Presser

By Rob Hager, SpeakOut | News Analysis

Obama's recent media counteroffensive against Edward Snowden is unquestionably a tribute to Edward Snowden's ability to poke the empire's all-seeing eye while managing to secure an offshore sanctuary where he might continue his premeditated acts of citizenship. Snowden's success and worldwide popularity for his David and Goliath struggle on behalf of his, and apparently the ACLU's, version of the Constitution has required the propagandist-in-chief to publicly enter the fray. Obama knows if Snowden ever does face a criminal jury, the trial will be very much a popularity contest between Obama and Snowden, with high-stakes for both.

Despite Mayor Emanuel's rhetoric about a "21st century education" for every student, his school budget cuts have resulted in the layoff of librarians at 50 elementary schools; at nearly all of them, that means they won't have functioning library.
Now CPS has gone a step further, demolishing the library built by parents at Whittier Elementary.

Despite the rhetoric about parent empowerment and community involvement — despite Barbara Byrd Bennett's high-sounding promises about "restoring trust" — the demolition was ordered and carried out with no communication with the parents who had created and fought for the library and community center they called La Casita.

A group of warehouse workers is about to receive a raise of about 60 percent.

"I haven't received my first paycheck just yet, but it will be about double," said Reynaldo Ríos Ibañez, who has worked at the warehouse since October 2011. "It means it will be easier to take care of my family. Before I could not buy one single extra thing."

Reynaldo and his sister, also a warehouse worker in the Inland Empire, support their parents and two other sisters.

Aug 21

Where is Freedom of the Press?

By Maria Armoudian, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

Earlier this week, British officials used their terrorism laws to detain for nine hours the Brazilian citizen, David Miranda, the partner of Guardian journalist, Glenn Greenwald, in London's Heathrow Airport.

The act has rightfully angered the journalism community and government watchdogs. But while the act smacks of harassment, some comments, such as that of Nick Cohen, columnist for the conservative weekly, The Spectator, came as a surprise. Cohen called the detention "a clarifying moment that reveals how far Britain has changed for the worse." That's a stretch. After all, for four years, 1988 to 1994, Britain passed, upheld and enforced a broadcasting ban during the Northern Ireland conflict, prohibiting the airing the voices of people the state deemed persona non grata, persons who are now high ranking public officials in Northern Ireland. The Republic of Ireland was not much better. They, too, banned the voices of the same people. While some journalists made a mockery of the British Broadcasting Ban by airing the faces and allowing actors to lip sync their words, others were powerless in the face of obey-or-lose-your job.

Aug 21

For First Time, ALEC Is Formally Requesting Open Records Immunity

By Staff, The Center for Media and Democracy | Report

The Center for Media and Democracy filed a letter with the Texas Attorney General on Thursday refuting efforts by the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) to declare itself immune from the state's open records law. Texas is the first known state where ALEC has formally asked an Attorney General for an exemption from sunshine-in-government laws, and it marks a new low in the organization's attempts to advance its legislative agenda in secret and avoid public accountability for facilitating special interest influence.

“You cannot just create a special private club between lobbyists and lawmakers and then claim your communications with legislators cannot be disclosed to the public under state sunshine laws,” said Lisa Graves, the Executive Director of the Center for Media and Democracy/ ALECexposed.org, “Allowing this would only increase the power of special interests to secretly influence officials elected to represent real people.”

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Speakout

SpeakOut is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. SpeakOut articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

Today, for the first time since August 21, 2003, the National Labor Relations Board has a full complement of five Senate confirmed members. Four new members, all nominated by President Barack Obama and confirmed last month by the U.S. Senate have been sworn into office. NLRB Chairman Mark Gaston Pearce was also confirmed last month to an additional five year term on the Board.

"The idea of universal suspicion without individual evidence is what Americans find abhorrent and what black men in America must constantly fight. It is pervasive in policing policies — like stop-and-frisk, and . . . neighborhood watch -- regardless of the collateral damage done to the majority of innocents. It's like burning down a house to rid it of mice."

Aug 24

Audacity of Dope? Yes We Scan?

By Steven Hill, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

This president has become a tragic figure, more so every day with each new revelation of how far the surveillance state has been developed and implemented under his watch. And how far they will go -- detaining the partner of reporter Glen Greenwald, investigating other reporters, smashing the hard drives of a leading newspaper -- to intimidate journalists and editors trying to report on it. Big Brother is watching, and cracking down on those who want to reveal the King's secrets. The U.S. even has bugged European Union offices -- supposedly our allies -- and world leaders at international conferences of the G-20.

Aug 24

Bad Precedent and Bad Faith

By Lawrence Davidson, To the Point Analysis | News Analysis

Back in January of 2012 a lawsuit, organized by activist Tangerine Bolen (who also did the fundraising that made the legal effort possible) involving multiple plaintiffs including former war correspondent Christopher Hedges was filed in federal court challenging the constitutionality of the 2012 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). Specifically, the suit called into question the Act's Section 1021(b)(2), which allows for indefinite detention by the U.S. military of people "who are part of or substantially support Al Qaeda, the Taliban or associated forces engaged in hostilities against the United States." This detention denies those held of the ability to "contest the allegations against them because they have no right to be notified of the specific charges against them." In this suit filed by Hedges et al., the issue in question was the vagueness of the terms "substantially support" and "associated forces." For instance, could this vagueness lead to apprehension and detention of journalists who publish interviews with members of Al Qaeda or the Taliban? Could it lead to the same treatment against political activists protesting U.S. policies against these or "associated" groups?

Over the past months, I have been shocked and dismayed to hear the revelations by the courageous women who continue to tell their stories of sexual harassment and abuse at the hands of San Diego's Mayor Bob Filner. When I saw the four brave women speak out in a joint interview, I made a decision that I could no longer remain silent.. It is high time for men to step up and join the courageous woman on the front lines, who have been victims and survivors of Bob Filner's utter personal disregard, disrespect and degradation of women, as expressed through his unwanted sexual advances, which are at the lower end of a continuum of sexual abuse and assault.

Aug 22

Obama Vs. Snowden: Parsing the Presser

By Rob Hager, SpeakOut | News Analysis

Obama's recent media counteroffensive against Edward Snowden is unquestionably a tribute to Edward Snowden's ability to poke the empire's all-seeing eye while managing to secure an offshore sanctuary where he might continue his premeditated acts of citizenship. Snowden's success and worldwide popularity for his David and Goliath struggle on behalf of his, and apparently the ACLU's, version of the Constitution has required the propagandist-in-chief to publicly enter the fray. Obama knows if Snowden ever does face a criminal jury, the trial will be very much a popularity contest between Obama and Snowden, with high-stakes for both.

Despite Mayor Emanuel's rhetoric about a "21st century education" for every student, his school budget cuts have resulted in the layoff of librarians at 50 elementary schools; at nearly all of them, that means they won't have functioning library.
Now CPS has gone a step further, demolishing the library built by parents at Whittier Elementary.

Despite the rhetoric about parent empowerment and community involvement — despite Barbara Byrd Bennett's high-sounding promises about "restoring trust" — the demolition was ordered and carried out with no communication with the parents who had created and fought for the library and community center they called La Casita.

A group of warehouse workers is about to receive a raise of about 60 percent.

"I haven't received my first paycheck just yet, but it will be about double," said Reynaldo Ríos Ibañez, who has worked at the warehouse since October 2011. "It means it will be easier to take care of my family. Before I could not buy one single extra thing."

Reynaldo and his sister, also a warehouse worker in the Inland Empire, support their parents and two other sisters.

Aug 21

Where is Freedom of the Press?

By Maria Armoudian, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

Earlier this week, British officials used their terrorism laws to detain for nine hours the Brazilian citizen, David Miranda, the partner of Guardian journalist, Glenn Greenwald, in London's Heathrow Airport.

The act has rightfully angered the journalism community and government watchdogs. But while the act smacks of harassment, some comments, such as that of Nick Cohen, columnist for the conservative weekly, The Spectator, came as a surprise. Cohen called the detention "a clarifying moment that reveals how far Britain has changed for the worse." That's a stretch. After all, for four years, 1988 to 1994, Britain passed, upheld and enforced a broadcasting ban during the Northern Ireland conflict, prohibiting the airing the voices of people the state deemed persona non grata, persons who are now high ranking public officials in Northern Ireland. The Republic of Ireland was not much better. They, too, banned the voices of the same people. While some journalists made a mockery of the British Broadcasting Ban by airing the faces and allowing actors to lip sync their words, others were powerless in the face of obey-or-lose-your job.

Aug 21

For First Time, ALEC Is Formally Requesting Open Records Immunity

By Staff, The Center for Media and Democracy | Report

The Center for Media and Democracy filed a letter with the Texas Attorney General on Thursday refuting efforts by the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) to declare itself immune from the state's open records law. Texas is the first known state where ALEC has formally asked an Attorney General for an exemption from sunshine-in-government laws, and it marks a new low in the organization's attempts to advance its legislative agenda in secret and avoid public accountability for facilitating special interest influence.

“You cannot just create a special private club between lobbyists and lawmakers and then claim your communications with legislators cannot be disclosed to the public under state sunshine laws,” said Lisa Graves, the Executive Director of the Center for Media and Democracy/ ALECexposed.org, “Allowing this would only increase the power of special interests to secretly influence officials elected to represent real people.”