Tuesday, 26 July 2016 / TRUTH-OUT.ORG

POWERED BY READERS

Our nonprofit newsroom is everything the mainstream media is not.

Through investigative journalism and daily news analysis, Truthout is a vital resource for relevant and trustworthy news.

Support from readers is the only way we can continue publishing the stories you want to see. Make a donation today!

Click here
to donate.

Speakout

Speakout is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. Speakout articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

The climate justice movement, however, won't take this 366th day for granted. Those activists are spending those extra 24 hours - and then some - brainstorming how the world might move on from a corporate-controlled and fossil-fueled economy toward a greener and more equitable way of life that does a better job of taking care of human needs.

Feb 26

Democratic Primaries: The Latino Vote

By Naqi A. Jaffery, Speakout | News Analysis

Early in the current primary season, Hillary Clinton had a significant edge over Bernie Sanders among Latino voters. Clinton further seemed to solidify her position when she grabbed the endorsement of secretary of housing and urban development, Julián Castro and some key Latino heavy hitters. Sanders' supporters include Rep. Raul Grijalva, son of a migrant worker from Mexico, who happens to be the first congressman to endorse the candidate, and prominent activist Arturo Carmona, who Sanders appointed as his Latino outreach director.

Bolivian President Evo Morales lost the referendum last Sunday that could have given him the ability to run for re-election in 2019. The margin was small, but the implications are huge: Bolivia's longest standing and most popular president finally has an end date for his time in power, on January 22, 2020. The lead up to the election was brutal, with an array of corruption scandals and conflicts, the most tragic of which was a protest last Wednesday against the opposition-controlled mayor's office that resulted in a fire leading to six deaths.

For those "feeling the Bern," this is not the moment to throw another log on the fire, curl up on your couch and immerse yourself in books about the most popular brand to emerge from Vermont since Ben & Jerry's. In upcoming Democratic primary states, door-knocking, phone banking and voting will likely be a far higher priority - particularly among those newly fired up by Bernie Sanders' landslide victory in New Hampshire on February 9.

On Thursday, February 18, minimum wage and housing justice activists in Oregon descended on Salem to protest a weakened wage proposal and delayed renters' rights legislation. $15Now Oregon - the state wing of the larger Fight for $15 movement sweeping the country - saw opposition over the last several months coming from the much more moderate Raise the Wage coalition and its $13.50 minimum wage proposal. The bill that passed the Oregon Legislature, which would raise the minimum wage to the highest in the country, would bring the minimum wage in Portland to $14.75 by 2022.

This is not a plan to close Guantánamo. It lays out several obvious steps that the Center for Constitutional Rights has long called for, and that the Obama administration has long reneged on - finally releasing the men who have been cleared for transfer, most for years, and strengthening and speeding up the Periodic Review Board process - but talk is cheap. Unless the Obama administration shows real will and dramatically steps up its efforts on these basic fronts, men whose detentions the administration itself has determined are unnecessary will continue to languish.

In this report, acTVism Munich provides an overview of the activities that took place on the 9th of February, 2016, the day when the Democracy in Europe Movement 2025 was launched by Yanis Varoufakis and Srecko Horvat at Volksbühne in Berlin. This report aims to give the public a transparent view by documenting the activities and interviewing organizers and participants. Interview partners include Yanis Varoufakis, SreckoHorvat, Katja Kipping and Gesine Schwan. 

Feb 23

The Four Economists' Big Letter

By Dean Baker, Speakout | Op-Ed

Everyone following the Democratic presidential primary race almost certainly heard about the Big Letter. Four former heads of the Council of Economic Advisers (CEA) under Democratic presidents signed an open letter condemning an analysis of Bernie Sanders' platform by University of Massachusetts economist Gerald Friedman. The letter asserted that Friedman's analysis made "extreme claims that cannot be supported by the economic evidence."

Like a dry Christmas tree, social media spaces exploded on news of the vacancy left by Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. Immediately, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell called upon Republicans to draw battle lines against any nomination coming from President Obama. Within hours of Justice Scalia passing, the unseemly speed of McConnell's announcement was reflective of the polarization that has consistently put partisanship before the legislative work of the nation, plaguing both terms of Barack Obama's presidency.

Last month, as US border patrol agents began rounding up Central American women and children denied asylum, asmall group of international peace activists from Voices for Creative Nonviolence boarded a plane for Helsinki, Finland, to visit two longtime Iraqi friends who fled Baghdad last summer and somehow completed a perilous seven-week journey over land and sea to reach this northern seaport.

GET DAILY TRUTHOUT UPDATES
Optional Member Code

FOLLOW togtorsstottofb

Popular On Speakout


Speakout

Speakout is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. Speakout articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

The climate justice movement, however, won't take this 366th day for granted. Those activists are spending those extra 24 hours - and then some - brainstorming how the world might move on from a corporate-controlled and fossil-fueled economy toward a greener and more equitable way of life that does a better job of taking care of human needs.

Feb 26

Democratic Primaries: The Latino Vote

By Naqi A. Jaffery, Speakout | News Analysis

Early in the current primary season, Hillary Clinton had a significant edge over Bernie Sanders among Latino voters. Clinton further seemed to solidify her position when she grabbed the endorsement of secretary of housing and urban development, Julián Castro and some key Latino heavy hitters. Sanders' supporters include Rep. Raul Grijalva, son of a migrant worker from Mexico, who happens to be the first congressman to endorse the candidate, and prominent activist Arturo Carmona, who Sanders appointed as his Latino outreach director.

Bolivian President Evo Morales lost the referendum last Sunday that could have given him the ability to run for re-election in 2019. The margin was small, but the implications are huge: Bolivia's longest standing and most popular president finally has an end date for his time in power, on January 22, 2020. The lead up to the election was brutal, with an array of corruption scandals and conflicts, the most tragic of which was a protest last Wednesday against the opposition-controlled mayor's office that resulted in a fire leading to six deaths.

For those "feeling the Bern," this is not the moment to throw another log on the fire, curl up on your couch and immerse yourself in books about the most popular brand to emerge from Vermont since Ben & Jerry's. In upcoming Democratic primary states, door-knocking, phone banking and voting will likely be a far higher priority - particularly among those newly fired up by Bernie Sanders' landslide victory in New Hampshire on February 9.

On Thursday, February 18, minimum wage and housing justice activists in Oregon descended on Salem to protest a weakened wage proposal and delayed renters' rights legislation. $15Now Oregon - the state wing of the larger Fight for $15 movement sweeping the country - saw opposition over the last several months coming from the much more moderate Raise the Wage coalition and its $13.50 minimum wage proposal. The bill that passed the Oregon Legislature, which would raise the minimum wage to the highest in the country, would bring the minimum wage in Portland to $14.75 by 2022.

This is not a plan to close Guantánamo. It lays out several obvious steps that the Center for Constitutional Rights has long called for, and that the Obama administration has long reneged on - finally releasing the men who have been cleared for transfer, most for years, and strengthening and speeding up the Periodic Review Board process - but talk is cheap. Unless the Obama administration shows real will and dramatically steps up its efforts on these basic fronts, men whose detentions the administration itself has determined are unnecessary will continue to languish.

In this report, acTVism Munich provides an overview of the activities that took place on the 9th of February, 2016, the day when the Democracy in Europe Movement 2025 was launched by Yanis Varoufakis and Srecko Horvat at Volksbühne in Berlin. This report aims to give the public a transparent view by documenting the activities and interviewing organizers and participants. Interview partners include Yanis Varoufakis, SreckoHorvat, Katja Kipping and Gesine Schwan. 

Feb 23

The Four Economists' Big Letter

By Dean Baker, Speakout | Op-Ed

Everyone following the Democratic presidential primary race almost certainly heard about the Big Letter. Four former heads of the Council of Economic Advisers (CEA) under Democratic presidents signed an open letter condemning an analysis of Bernie Sanders' platform by University of Massachusetts economist Gerald Friedman. The letter asserted that Friedman's analysis made "extreme claims that cannot be supported by the economic evidence."

Like a dry Christmas tree, social media spaces exploded on news of the vacancy left by Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. Immediately, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell called upon Republicans to draw battle lines against any nomination coming from President Obama. Within hours of Justice Scalia passing, the unseemly speed of McConnell's announcement was reflective of the polarization that has consistently put partisanship before the legislative work of the nation, plaguing both terms of Barack Obama's presidency.

Last month, as US border patrol agents began rounding up Central American women and children denied asylum, asmall group of international peace activists from Voices for Creative Nonviolence boarded a plane for Helsinki, Finland, to visit two longtime Iraqi friends who fled Baghdad last summer and somehow completed a perilous seven-week journey over land and sea to reach this northern seaport.