Friday, 31 October 2014 / TRUTH-OUT.ORG
  • 'Tis the Season to Be Frightened

    Ebola, Dengue fever, West Nile virus ... Republican ideology created some of these threats in the first place, or managed to make others worse. The climate crisis, which Republicans dismiss en masse, is a key ingredient in all of them.

  • The 0.01 Percent's "I Reap All" Accounts

    At least 9,000 wealthy Americans have amassed $5 million-plus sized IRAs. Multimillionaires and billionaires are shielding vast fortunes from taxation with monstrously huge IRAs.

Speakout

SpeakOut is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. SpeakOut articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

Dennis Trainor Jr. sits down with Congressman Adam Schiff (D-CA) to discuss money in politics, corporate personhood, overturning citizens united and amending the constitution.

As the world continues to ignore the damage that big business is inflicting on the planet, we are paying to maintain our ignorance. Lee Camp reports.

Feb 19

At the End of Capitalism's Rope

By Benjamin J George, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

Capitalism has an amazing duality inherent in its structure. It can build homes in Fordist fashion, yet yields homelessness. It can produce enough food for all, yet turns a blind-eye as much of the world starves. It discovers cures for diseases, but denies them to those afflicted. In short, this polarity is exactly that: profoundly positive at one end and woefully negative at the other.

One of the most shameful aspects at capitalism's negative end of the spectrum is that far too often its victims are voiceless, nameless individuals. Here we might think of a starving baby in Mogadishu or an AIDS victim in Botswana. Although I can remember pleas from NGOs and charity organizations that gave some voice to these victims while at the same time legitimating states and corporations by concealing the larger crimes from which such victims are suffering - but that is another part of the larger story. Instead, let's turn our attention to the 2,500 Greeks who have killed themselves since economic crisis beset the ancient land in 2010 or to US veterans who, also unable to find solace, take similar means toward that ultimate end at a rate of roughly 20 suicides per day.

Mark Helprin's novel, In Sunlight and in Shadow, tries to articulate as noble as possible a justification for the tragic violence of war. The novel is set just after World War II, so it is not surprising that the rationale is based in the Churchillian mind-set of the campaign to defeat Hitler. In the novel, an older veteran argues: "How many millions have to die, Harry, before we stop worrying about unintended consequences?"

Harry, a younger vet, responds: "What if all nations decided to kill off what in their eyes was mortally dangerous leadership? It would become a Hobbesian world."

I'm in the thick of teaching at Vassar College at the moment. I just came off sabbatical and with lab activities to prepare, quizzes to grade, homework assignments to critique, office hours to keep for eager and inquisitive students, sometimes I long for the luxurious hours of reading and freewriting with production of the occasional "blessay."

But this morning all the effort I put in on behalf of my Vassar students seems worth it; this week they've made me especially grateful for the gift that it is to teach them. Thank you Vassar students for responding to the hateful call by the Westboro Baptist Church to protest in our school community. As reported in the Huffington Post, Vassar students responded to a notice from WBC calling attention to its plan to protest on our campus.

lan Dershowitz's opposition to the recent BDS panel discussion at Brooklyn College was easy for many people to dismiss, correctly, as Zionist chutzpah, but Norman Finkelstein's sharp attack on the BDS movement (see his You Tube interview here) as "disingenuous" and "silliness, childishness and a lot of leftist posturing" deserves more attention from those of us who support the Boycott-Divestment-Sanctions movement.

Finkelstein's argument goes like this:

When it came to financial collapse, Iceland did the opposite of us. The results are not allowed on our mainstream media; to learn more watch this clip, and to read about the return of debtor's prisons, go here.

Feb 15

Gun Control in the US: The “Cohen Act”?

By Matthew Feldman and Leonard Weinberg, Fair Observer | News Analysis

In the weeks following the Newtown, Connecticut shootings on December 14, 2012, there have been highly publicized appeals for Congress and the Obama Administration to enact measures prohibiting certain guns (e.g. assault rifles) and requiring background checks on those wishing to purchase firearms. Most notably, in the days after Adam Lanza's massacre of twenty-six children and teachers at Sandy Hook Elementary, Vice-President Biden was given the difficult task of proposing recommendations to restrict rampant American gun violence – responsible for some 30,000 American deaths each year. Biden's recommendations were endorsed by Obama on January 16, 2013, with "universal" background checks now a "top priority" for ensuing legislation.

Statement in Response to Third DPRK Nuclear Explosive Test

We come from diverse backgrounds and hold a range of analyses (or perspectives) approaching the proposed North Korean nuclear weapons test and the further militarization of Asia and the Pacific.

We oppose the development, possession of, and threats to use nuclear weapons by any nation. We are committed to creating a world free of nuclear weapons. We have deep concerns that North Korea's third nuclear weapons test contributes to an increasingly dangerous region-wide nuclear arms race. We understand the North Korean test was part of a cycle of threat and response to previous U.S. nuclear threats, and to continued military provocations. We cannot ignore the double standards and hypocrisies of the members of the "nuclear club" who refuse to fulfill their Article VI disarmament commitments of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty commitments by "modernizing" their omnicidal arsenals while insisting that other nations refrain from becoming nuclear powers. While North Korea has conducted three explosive nuclear tests, compared to the United States' 1,054.

Feb 15

Resignations, Plagiarism and a Dirty Trick

By Victor Grossman, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

Today’s article is sort of a potpourri. Pronounced by an English-speaker, that sounds like Popery, which is currently very relevant. When Pope Benedict XVI was elected in 2005, the first German Pope since Victor II (1055-1057 - succeeded by a Pope Stephen), the dominant mass rag here, the Springer syndicate’s BILD newspaper, had a page-high headline “We Are Pope!” Now alas, this distinction will disappear, which may especially sadden the big L-shaped Roman Catholic area of Germany – the Southern tier, especially Bavaria, then northward along the Rhine valley. The rest is largely Evangelical (Lutheran), including eastern Germany; other religious faiths are small minorities, aside from the Turks and other Muslims. Or the pagans! Both Catholic and Evangelical churches had hoped for big gains after East Germany was “freed from atheist repression”. To their disappointment, there was no rush into the churches. One reason was widespread lack of interest or any belief in a God or heaven. Another key factor is the church tax, automatically taken out of all wages, salaries, even royalty fees for every member of the Catholic, Evangelical, Jewish and some other faiths - a stiff 8 or 9 percent! Less than 30 percent of Easterners decided to pay, even though it made them ineligible for church weddings and funerals.

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Speakout

SpeakOut is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. SpeakOut articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

Dennis Trainor Jr. sits down with Congressman Adam Schiff (D-CA) to discuss money in politics, corporate personhood, overturning citizens united and amending the constitution.

As the world continues to ignore the damage that big business is inflicting on the planet, we are paying to maintain our ignorance. Lee Camp reports.

Feb 19

At the End of Capitalism's Rope

By Benjamin J George, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

Capitalism has an amazing duality inherent in its structure. It can build homes in Fordist fashion, yet yields homelessness. It can produce enough food for all, yet turns a blind-eye as much of the world starves. It discovers cures for diseases, but denies them to those afflicted. In short, this polarity is exactly that: profoundly positive at one end and woefully negative at the other.

One of the most shameful aspects at capitalism's negative end of the spectrum is that far too often its victims are voiceless, nameless individuals. Here we might think of a starving baby in Mogadishu or an AIDS victim in Botswana. Although I can remember pleas from NGOs and charity organizations that gave some voice to these victims while at the same time legitimating states and corporations by concealing the larger crimes from which such victims are suffering - but that is another part of the larger story. Instead, let's turn our attention to the 2,500 Greeks who have killed themselves since economic crisis beset the ancient land in 2010 or to US veterans who, also unable to find solace, take similar means toward that ultimate end at a rate of roughly 20 suicides per day.

Mark Helprin's novel, In Sunlight and in Shadow, tries to articulate as noble as possible a justification for the tragic violence of war. The novel is set just after World War II, so it is not surprising that the rationale is based in the Churchillian mind-set of the campaign to defeat Hitler. In the novel, an older veteran argues: "How many millions have to die, Harry, before we stop worrying about unintended consequences?"

Harry, a younger vet, responds: "What if all nations decided to kill off what in their eyes was mortally dangerous leadership? It would become a Hobbesian world."

I'm in the thick of teaching at Vassar College at the moment. I just came off sabbatical and with lab activities to prepare, quizzes to grade, homework assignments to critique, office hours to keep for eager and inquisitive students, sometimes I long for the luxurious hours of reading and freewriting with production of the occasional "blessay."

But this morning all the effort I put in on behalf of my Vassar students seems worth it; this week they've made me especially grateful for the gift that it is to teach them. Thank you Vassar students for responding to the hateful call by the Westboro Baptist Church to protest in our school community. As reported in the Huffington Post, Vassar students responded to a notice from WBC calling attention to its plan to protest on our campus.

lan Dershowitz's opposition to the recent BDS panel discussion at Brooklyn College was easy for many people to dismiss, correctly, as Zionist chutzpah, but Norman Finkelstein's sharp attack on the BDS movement (see his You Tube interview here) as "disingenuous" and "silliness, childishness and a lot of leftist posturing" deserves more attention from those of us who support the Boycott-Divestment-Sanctions movement.

Finkelstein's argument goes like this:

When it came to financial collapse, Iceland did the opposite of us. The results are not allowed on our mainstream media; to learn more watch this clip, and to read about the return of debtor's prisons, go here.

Feb 15

Gun Control in the US: The “Cohen Act”?

By Matthew Feldman and Leonard Weinberg, Fair Observer | News Analysis

In the weeks following the Newtown, Connecticut shootings on December 14, 2012, there have been highly publicized appeals for Congress and the Obama Administration to enact measures prohibiting certain guns (e.g. assault rifles) and requiring background checks on those wishing to purchase firearms. Most notably, in the days after Adam Lanza's massacre of twenty-six children and teachers at Sandy Hook Elementary, Vice-President Biden was given the difficult task of proposing recommendations to restrict rampant American gun violence – responsible for some 30,000 American deaths each year. Biden's recommendations were endorsed by Obama on January 16, 2013, with "universal" background checks now a "top priority" for ensuing legislation.

Statement in Response to Third DPRK Nuclear Explosive Test

We come from diverse backgrounds and hold a range of analyses (or perspectives) approaching the proposed North Korean nuclear weapons test and the further militarization of Asia and the Pacific.

We oppose the development, possession of, and threats to use nuclear weapons by any nation. We are committed to creating a world free of nuclear weapons. We have deep concerns that North Korea's third nuclear weapons test contributes to an increasingly dangerous region-wide nuclear arms race. We understand the North Korean test was part of a cycle of threat and response to previous U.S. nuclear threats, and to continued military provocations. We cannot ignore the double standards and hypocrisies of the members of the "nuclear club" who refuse to fulfill their Article VI disarmament commitments of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty commitments by "modernizing" their omnicidal arsenals while insisting that other nations refrain from becoming nuclear powers. While North Korea has conducted three explosive nuclear tests, compared to the United States' 1,054.

Feb 15

Resignations, Plagiarism and a Dirty Trick

By Victor Grossman, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

Today’s article is sort of a potpourri. Pronounced by an English-speaker, that sounds like Popery, which is currently very relevant. When Pope Benedict XVI was elected in 2005, the first German Pope since Victor II (1055-1057 - succeeded by a Pope Stephen), the dominant mass rag here, the Springer syndicate’s BILD newspaper, had a page-high headline “We Are Pope!” Now alas, this distinction will disappear, which may especially sadden the big L-shaped Roman Catholic area of Germany – the Southern tier, especially Bavaria, then northward along the Rhine valley. The rest is largely Evangelical (Lutheran), including eastern Germany; other religious faiths are small minorities, aside from the Turks and other Muslims. Or the pagans! Both Catholic and Evangelical churches had hoped for big gains after East Germany was “freed from atheist repression”. To their disappointment, there was no rush into the churches. One reason was widespread lack of interest or any belief in a God or heaven. Another key factor is the church tax, automatically taken out of all wages, salaries, even royalty fees for every member of the Catholic, Evangelical, Jewish and some other faiths - a stiff 8 or 9 percent! Less than 30 percent of Easterners decided to pay, even though it made them ineligible for church weddings and funerals.