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Speakout

SpeakOut is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. SpeakOut articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

Feb 08

The Day We Fight Back Against The NSA

By Dennis Trainor Jr, Popular Resistance | Video Report

Members of the New York City Light Brigade, The Illuminator Art Collective and other allies turned the Verizon building in downtown New York into a large billboard to project the all seeing “NSA eye” along with text stating “you will never be alone”, “our eye is on you”, and “Wherever you go, whatever you do, you are under surveillance.”

Feb 08

Afghanistan Is Coming Out of the Closet

By Nemat Sadat, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

My coming out launched a hurricane upon my landlocked country of origin, where homosexuality can be penalized with the death penalty. The tidal wave surged last August when I broadcasted this message on Facebook:

"I'm so happy to have finished the process of 'coming out' to the entire world. Burden lifted forever. For the last few people in the planet who don't know, let me tell you now: Yes, I am proud to be gay, Afghan, American and Muslim. So get over it! Now, I can live life without all the aunties & uncles harassing and pressuring with questions like why I haven't married a woman. If they do, I will simply shake my head, snap my finger, toss my hair and tell them I am marrying a distinguished gentleman and in Pashto we call it خاوند "khaawand" (owner, proprietor husband) and if you want to offer your son or nephew for my hand then tell him I want a platinum ring on my finger, a Central Park wedding ceremony and a Manhattan skyscraper rooftop reception afterwards. I have it allout. The bespoke lifestyle awaits. Oh yeah!" 

Feb 08

Animal Rights "Terrorism" Law Should be Struck Down, Attorneys Argue

By The Center for Constitutional Rights, SpeakOut | Press Release

February 3, Boston – Today, attorneys from the Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) urged the First Circuit Court of Appeals to strike down the federal Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act (AETA) as a violation of the First Amendment.  Enacted in 2006, the AETA punishes anyone found to have caused the loss of property or profits to a business or other institution that uses or sells animals or animalproducts, or to “a person or entity having a connection to, relationship with, or transactions with ananimal enterprise.”  Critics argue that the law is so broad that it punishes peaceful protests like boycotts and picketing that cause businesses to lose profits and turns non-violent civil disobedience into “terrorism.”  CCR filed the first civil challenge to the AETA, Blum v. Holder, in 2011.

Feb 08

Move Our World Beyond War

By Staff, World Beyond War | Video

The video is mightier than the hellfire missile. Make this one go viral. Learn more at http://worldbeyondwar.org

Washington, DC – The Government Accountability Project (GAP) is distributing and encouraging use of a Privacy Statement for all Internet users to adopt as part of their signature line in their online communications. Similar to the standard legal disclaimers found at the end of many emails, this Privacy Statement goes further by explicitly prohibiting the collection of the communication and related metadata by the National Security Agency (NSA), consistent with the disclosures of the bulk metadata collection programrevealed by GAP client Edward Snowden in June 2013.

Feb 07

Three More States Seek to Curb Reckless Outsourcing of Public Services, Protect Taxpayers

By In The Public Interest Team, SpeakOut | Press Release

Washington, DC – Legislators in California, Georgia, and Oklahoma are joining a national movement to reign in reckless outsourcing of public services to for-profit corporations and private entities, introducing bills that would keep taxpayers in control of their public services by increasing transparency and accountability standards for outsourcing deals.

Feb 07

Florida Does it Again

By Laura Finley, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

Last time I wrote about things that trouble me in my current home state of Florida, I received some pretty nasty responses. One person emailed that my criticism of some of the laws in the state was an affront to those who have served the U.S in foreign wars (I still don’t see how, but never mind) and strongly suggested that I move to Russia or Saudi Arabia. But, eight years after my arrival, I am still here, and at the risk of receiving even more hateful responses, I am again compelled to offer a criticism of some of Florida’s latest dandies.

The D.C. Council took a major step to decriminalizing marijuana in the nation’s capital today by voting 11-1 in favor of a bill that would eliminate criminal penalties for the possession of one ounce or less of marijuana and treat possession as a civil offense. The D.C. Council takes a final vote on the bill in early March; it is expected to pass and to be signed into law by the mayor. It is viewed by both council members and advocates as a model for other jurisdictions looking to reduce racial disparities in the criminal justice system.

Feb 07

Did Often Overlooked Black Leader Predict Plight of Obama?

By Jermel Shim, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

Each February we reflect upon black history and honor prominent black leaders who have made a positive contribution to American history. However, some prominent black leaders are consistently overlooked during this month of black reflection, despite their significant roles in American history. Marcus Garvey (1867-1940) is one such leader who is too often overlooked.

Taking advantage of the Super Bowl hype, Mother Jones magazine just released an article “Offensive Lines: How Bad Is Your NFL Team’s Owner?” following up on its earlier “Is Your Team’s Owner a Major League Asshole?” While Mother Jones’s intention to decry the increasing inequality in contemporary American society is laudable, its attempted shaming of professional team owners as “evil-doers” may be a counterproductive distraction. More importantly, in blaming individuals for society’s ills, MoJo loses an opportunity to engage in good journalism.