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Speakout

Speakout is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. Speakout articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

Along with VCNV companions, I'm part of a 150 mile walk from Chicago to Thomson, IL, a small town in Northwest IL where the US Bureau of Prisons is setting up an Administrative Maximum prison, also known as a Supermax. Prison laborers from US minimum security prisons now labor to turn what once was an Illinois state prison into a federal supermax detention facility with 1900 cells that will confine prisoners for 23 hours of every day.

The US deposed Muammar Gaddafi and Saddam Hussein, but now many Americans are choosing to back their own strongman. Donald Trump's bad boy image plays to an irrational immaturity in US voters and exposes a naïve trust in outlandish promises. "I could stand in the middle of 5th Avenue and shoot somebody and I wouldn't lose any voters." That braggadocios boast may not be true, but it does please his base. Donald Trump knows how to appeal to the United States' macho, romantic, gun-culture.

We have some long unanswered questions in US health care: Is health care in the public interest based on medical need, not ability to pay? Is it a commodity on an unfettered for-profit, largely investor-owned corporate marketplace? Is it different from other commodities? And who is the health care system for -- providers of services or patients? The questions have not received much public or policy debate over the last 50 years, but the answers have been solidly entrenched in the medical-industrial complex over that period.

In the past year, students in South Africa, the United States, the United Kingdom, Brazil and India have mobilized to challenge the status quo at their universities. An important strand of the student movements seeks to "decolonize" universities by contesting the symbols, systems and daily experiences of privilege, knowledge and knowledge production that were instituted, along with many universities, in the service of colonialism. One collection of movements, often labeled together as "RhodesMustFall," contests the legacy of Cecil John Rhodes, the whip of British imperial capitalism in southern Africa.

As I sat in the San Diego sunshine Sunday listening to Bernie Sanders outside of Qualcomm Stadium, I was struck by the stunning contrast between the senator and Donald Trump, particularly on the issue of race. Sanders emphasized racial justice, citing the courage of African Americans and their allies who fought against racism and bigotry during Jim Crow. He talked of the thousands of undocumented workers who are ruthlessly exploited, overworked and underpaid, vowing to end the current deportation policies.

Jun 09

Four 100-Year-Old Activists Have Hope for the Future

By Debbie Metke, Speakout | Video Interview

Ask almost any older person and you'll hear, "The world is going to hell and I'm glad I lived in the best of times." But for four 100-year-old activists who were honored in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on April 9, 2016, they have a different story. Having lived from horses and buggies to space crafts out of the solar system, all four exclaimed their only real hope for the future -- and it involves an empowered the United Nations.

The Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan (RAWA), is the oldest women's organization in Afghanistan that fights for freedom, democracy, social justice, and secularism. RAWA's founder was Meena who formed this group at a young age in 1977, with the help of some other female university students in Kabul. Meena was assassinated in Quetta, Pakistan in 1987 by agents of KHAD (Afghanistan branch of KGB) with the help of the bloodthirsty fundamentalist gang of Gulbuddin Hekmatyar. She was only 30-years-old. What distinguishes RAWA from other associations is the fact that we are a political organization.

One of the more curious sideline elements in the 2016 Democratic Party primary came in a debate conducted by Univision on March 9, 2016, between Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton, wherein many of the questions were focused on issues of specific concern to that network's Spanish-speaking viewer base. As one might predict, the candidates' positions on immigration and border policy were heavily featured, as was the Obama administration's recent openings to Cuba. 

Jun 08

Is There Any Hope in a Nuclear Empire?

By Russell Webster, Speakout | Op-Ed

Those in power often make fallacious arguments that in order to reach peaceful ends, societies must use violent means. A programmed and indoctrinated sense of superiority and exceptionalism causes many to internalize the idea that in certain circumstances, many innocent people must be killed in order to achieve peace; that mass-murder is both a fact of human nature and a necessary evil. Nothing could be further from truth, however.

Oakland, California, is a haven for social justice. When we see injustice, we take to the streets. I've attended numerous protests over the years -- from Black Lives Matter rallies to disruptions of Trump speeches. Until recently, the most violence I had faced was at the Trump rally where attendees railed against me as a queer woman of color. On Monday May 30, 2016, though, I met violence at a very different sort of event: a Bernie Sanders rally. More than a dozen of my fellow activists with Direct Action Everywhere (DxE) and I attempted to access the stage to hoist a banner, the sort of nonviolent action that has been used by numerous movements and which Bernie Sanders says he supports.

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Speakout

Speakout is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. Speakout articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

Along with VCNV companions, I'm part of a 150 mile walk from Chicago to Thomson, IL, a small town in Northwest IL where the US Bureau of Prisons is setting up an Administrative Maximum prison, also known as a Supermax. Prison laborers from US minimum security prisons now labor to turn what once was an Illinois state prison into a federal supermax detention facility with 1900 cells that will confine prisoners for 23 hours of every day.

The US deposed Muammar Gaddafi and Saddam Hussein, but now many Americans are choosing to back their own strongman. Donald Trump's bad boy image plays to an irrational immaturity in US voters and exposes a naïve trust in outlandish promises. "I could stand in the middle of 5th Avenue and shoot somebody and I wouldn't lose any voters." That braggadocios boast may not be true, but it does please his base. Donald Trump knows how to appeal to the United States' macho, romantic, gun-culture.

We have some long unanswered questions in US health care: Is health care in the public interest based on medical need, not ability to pay? Is it a commodity on an unfettered for-profit, largely investor-owned corporate marketplace? Is it different from other commodities? And who is the health care system for -- providers of services or patients? The questions have not received much public or policy debate over the last 50 years, but the answers have been solidly entrenched in the medical-industrial complex over that period.

In the past year, students in South Africa, the United States, the United Kingdom, Brazil and India have mobilized to challenge the status quo at their universities. An important strand of the student movements seeks to "decolonize" universities by contesting the symbols, systems and daily experiences of privilege, knowledge and knowledge production that were instituted, along with many universities, in the service of colonialism. One collection of movements, often labeled together as "RhodesMustFall," contests the legacy of Cecil John Rhodes, the whip of British imperial capitalism in southern Africa.

As I sat in the San Diego sunshine Sunday listening to Bernie Sanders outside of Qualcomm Stadium, I was struck by the stunning contrast between the senator and Donald Trump, particularly on the issue of race. Sanders emphasized racial justice, citing the courage of African Americans and their allies who fought against racism and bigotry during Jim Crow. He talked of the thousands of undocumented workers who are ruthlessly exploited, overworked and underpaid, vowing to end the current deportation policies.

Jun 09

Four 100-Year-Old Activists Have Hope for the Future

By Debbie Metke, Speakout | Video Interview

Ask almost any older person and you'll hear, "The world is going to hell and I'm glad I lived in the best of times." But for four 100-year-old activists who were honored in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on April 9, 2016, they have a different story. Having lived from horses and buggies to space crafts out of the solar system, all four exclaimed their only real hope for the future -- and it involves an empowered the United Nations.

The Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan (RAWA), is the oldest women's organization in Afghanistan that fights for freedom, democracy, social justice, and secularism. RAWA's founder was Meena who formed this group at a young age in 1977, with the help of some other female university students in Kabul. Meena was assassinated in Quetta, Pakistan in 1987 by agents of KHAD (Afghanistan branch of KGB) with the help of the bloodthirsty fundamentalist gang of Gulbuddin Hekmatyar. She was only 30-years-old. What distinguishes RAWA from other associations is the fact that we are a political organization.

One of the more curious sideline elements in the 2016 Democratic Party primary came in a debate conducted by Univision on March 9, 2016, between Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton, wherein many of the questions were focused on issues of specific concern to that network's Spanish-speaking viewer base. As one might predict, the candidates' positions on immigration and border policy were heavily featured, as was the Obama administration's recent openings to Cuba. 

Jun 08

Is There Any Hope in a Nuclear Empire?

By Russell Webster, Speakout | Op-Ed

Those in power often make fallacious arguments that in order to reach peaceful ends, societies must use violent means. A programmed and indoctrinated sense of superiority and exceptionalism causes many to internalize the idea that in certain circumstances, many innocent people must be killed in order to achieve peace; that mass-murder is both a fact of human nature and a necessary evil. Nothing could be further from truth, however.

Oakland, California, is a haven for social justice. When we see injustice, we take to the streets. I've attended numerous protests over the years -- from Black Lives Matter rallies to disruptions of Trump speeches. Until recently, the most violence I had faced was at the Trump rally where attendees railed against me as a queer woman of color. On Monday May 30, 2016, though, I met violence at a very different sort of event: a Bernie Sanders rally. More than a dozen of my fellow activists with Direct Action Everywhere (DxE) and I attempted to access the stage to hoist a banner, the sort of nonviolent action that has been used by numerous movements and which Bernie Sanders says he supports.