Tuesday, 21 April 2015 / TRUTH-OUT.ORG

Speakout

SpeakOut is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. SpeakOut articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

Jan 05

Beyond Hegemony: Obama's Legacy

By Cary Fraser, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

In the aftermath of the 2014 mid-term Congressional elections in the United States, there was a widespread perception among the American chattering classes that the Obama administration, confronted by Republican majorities in both the House and the Senate, would become a lame duck in its final two years. Instead, the Republicans in recent weeks have had to confront a relaxed and reinvigorated President very focused upon ensuring that his legacy as a change agent in American politics would be solidified in American history.

On Sunday, Dec. 28, 2014, US led forces formally ended the war in Afghanistan, the longest war in American history. Some 18,000 foreign troops,  and about 10,600 of them American, however, are staying under the terms of two security pacts the Afghan government signed with the US and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. The war formally ended but the war informally continues. Fariba Nawa is an Afghan-American journalist and author of  Opium Nation: Child Brides, Drug Lords and One Woman’s Journey Through Afghanistan. She was interviewed by NAM editor, Andrew Lam. 

I wanted to write a piece about the most powerful moments in Chicago activism this year, but as I reviewed my photos and thought through what I saw and experienced in 2014, I realized that I can’t quite qualify things in those terms. As an organizer, I have a number of biases that are both undeniable and unavoidable, so I’m going to go ahead and clarify from the start that this is simply a look back at actions that moved me, changed me, or burned themselves into my memory – and in some cases, all three.

Writing and reporting about the Middle East is not an easy task, especially during these years of turmoil and upheaval. Following and reporting on these constant changes without a deep and compassionate understanding of the region will achieve little but predictable and lackluster content that offers nothing original, but recycled old ideas and stereotypes.

From my humble experience in the region, I share these “dos” and “don’ts” as to how the Middle East should be approached in writing and reporting.

Jan 05

The Challenge of the Islamic State and US Policy

By Karl Meyer and Kathy Kelly, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

What to do about the political mess in the Middle East and the rise of the Islamic State and related political movements?

Shortly after the end of World War II, the Western powers and the whole world began to recognize that the age of explicit colonial domination was over, and dozens of colonies were let go of and took political independence.

It is now past time for the United States and other world powers to recognize that the age of neo-colonial military, political and economic domination, especially in the Islamic Middle East, is decisively coming to a close.

Frida Berrigan sat straight up at the long dinner table. She was 12. Her younger brother Jerry and little sister Kate alternately jabbered and listened respectfully. It was a large table because her home was a community founded by her parents, Jonah House, in a tough neighborhood in Baltimore. Frida was the oldest child, clearly wise beyond her years as she sat eating, daughter of the most famous nonviolent resistance couple in US history except Martin and Coretta King. Before dinner the network news came on in the living room. Frida’s father, Phil Berrigan, waved us all into the small room, and sat down right next to the TV and turned it on precisely as the news started. All was quiet and the broadcast drudged through some latest foreign policy disaster. At the end of the national news, Phil, still sitting next to the TV, reached out and snapped it off, turning to me and meeting my eyes with his famous piercing look, “Shameless, Tom. They’re shameless.” And that was that. Kids knew better than to ask; no more TV until tomorrow evening news.

Sea-Level Rise

One of the most talked-about consequences of climate change is sea-level rise. The melting glaciers of Greenland could cause a rise of 7 meters, and in March 2014, scientists learned that Greenland's glaciers are melting much faster than previously believed. The melting West Antarctic ice shelf could cause an additional sea-level rise of 5 meters – and in May 2014 it was learned that thatice mass is also melting far more quickly than previously known.

Two-thirds of the world's cities with populations above 5 million people would be inundated by a sea level rise of 3.5 meters only – and that is not even accounting for storm surges from increasingly powerful hurricanes (think Katrina and Sandy). Bangladesh, Vietnam, China, Indonesia and the Philippines (the last two are archipelagos) will be particularly vulnerable to the rising sea level, and atoll nations such as Maldives and the Marshall Islands may literally cease to exist.

Jan 02

Peace on Earth - 2015

By Robert F. Dodge, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

At the beginning of each new year people around the world express their hopes and desires for seemingly elusive peace on earth. In the past year there have been many strides toward that goal. The greatest threat to peace and our survival, nuclear weapons, are at long last on the road to abolition. The people have spoken and leaders have heard. This new year we must recommit to the steps necessary to make this a reality.

In the words of Pope Francis,

Nuclear weapons are a global problem, affecting all nations, and impacting future generations and the planet that is our home. A global ethic is needed if we are to reduce the nuclear threat and work towards nuclear disarmament.

Governor Cuomo late last night vetoed a bill drafted by the correction officers’ union that seeks to protect guards from prosecution for acts of brutality against inmates at Rikers Island facilities. The bill would have given the Queens District Attorney exclusive jurisdiction in such cases.

“We’re relieved that Gov. Cuomo has put the health and safety of people, kids and even prison guards at Rikers Island over the political gamesmanship of the Correction Officers’ Benevolent Association,” said NYCLU Executive Director Donna Lieberman. “We need more accountability at Rikers, not less, and a wholesale reform of the culture of corruption and abuse that has gone on for too long."

I would like to write a poem and nail it
to a stake at humanity’s crossroads.
It would say: choose your path wisely.

It would say: this path we are on is far
too treacherous, a trap for the unwary
and complacent.

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Speakout

SpeakOut is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. SpeakOut articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

Jan 05

Beyond Hegemony: Obama's Legacy

By Cary Fraser, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

In the aftermath of the 2014 mid-term Congressional elections in the United States, there was a widespread perception among the American chattering classes that the Obama administration, confronted by Republican majorities in both the House and the Senate, would become a lame duck in its final two years. Instead, the Republicans in recent weeks have had to confront a relaxed and reinvigorated President very focused upon ensuring that his legacy as a change agent in American politics would be solidified in American history.

On Sunday, Dec. 28, 2014, US led forces formally ended the war in Afghanistan, the longest war in American history. Some 18,000 foreign troops,  and about 10,600 of them American, however, are staying under the terms of two security pacts the Afghan government signed with the US and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. The war formally ended but the war informally continues. Fariba Nawa is an Afghan-American journalist and author of  Opium Nation: Child Brides, Drug Lords and One Woman’s Journey Through Afghanistan. She was interviewed by NAM editor, Andrew Lam. 

I wanted to write a piece about the most powerful moments in Chicago activism this year, but as I reviewed my photos and thought through what I saw and experienced in 2014, I realized that I can’t quite qualify things in those terms. As an organizer, I have a number of biases that are both undeniable and unavoidable, so I’m going to go ahead and clarify from the start that this is simply a look back at actions that moved me, changed me, or burned themselves into my memory – and in some cases, all three.

Writing and reporting about the Middle East is not an easy task, especially during these years of turmoil and upheaval. Following and reporting on these constant changes without a deep and compassionate understanding of the region will achieve little but predictable and lackluster content that offers nothing original, but recycled old ideas and stereotypes.

From my humble experience in the region, I share these “dos” and “don’ts” as to how the Middle East should be approached in writing and reporting.

Jan 05

The Challenge of the Islamic State and US Policy

By Karl Meyer and Kathy Kelly, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

What to do about the political mess in the Middle East and the rise of the Islamic State and related political movements?

Shortly after the end of World War II, the Western powers and the whole world began to recognize that the age of explicit colonial domination was over, and dozens of colonies were let go of and took political independence.

It is now past time for the United States and other world powers to recognize that the age of neo-colonial military, political and economic domination, especially in the Islamic Middle East, is decisively coming to a close.

Frida Berrigan sat straight up at the long dinner table. She was 12. Her younger brother Jerry and little sister Kate alternately jabbered and listened respectfully. It was a large table because her home was a community founded by her parents, Jonah House, in a tough neighborhood in Baltimore. Frida was the oldest child, clearly wise beyond her years as she sat eating, daughter of the most famous nonviolent resistance couple in US history except Martin and Coretta King. Before dinner the network news came on in the living room. Frida’s father, Phil Berrigan, waved us all into the small room, and sat down right next to the TV and turned it on precisely as the news started. All was quiet and the broadcast drudged through some latest foreign policy disaster. At the end of the national news, Phil, still sitting next to the TV, reached out and snapped it off, turning to me and meeting my eyes with his famous piercing look, “Shameless, Tom. They’re shameless.” And that was that. Kids knew better than to ask; no more TV until tomorrow evening news.

Sea-Level Rise

One of the most talked-about consequences of climate change is sea-level rise. The melting glaciers of Greenland could cause a rise of 7 meters, and in March 2014, scientists learned that Greenland's glaciers are melting much faster than previously believed. The melting West Antarctic ice shelf could cause an additional sea-level rise of 5 meters – and in May 2014 it was learned that thatice mass is also melting far more quickly than previously known.

Two-thirds of the world's cities with populations above 5 million people would be inundated by a sea level rise of 3.5 meters only – and that is not even accounting for storm surges from increasingly powerful hurricanes (think Katrina and Sandy). Bangladesh, Vietnam, China, Indonesia and the Philippines (the last two are archipelagos) will be particularly vulnerable to the rising sea level, and atoll nations such as Maldives and the Marshall Islands may literally cease to exist.

Jan 02

Peace on Earth - 2015

By Robert F. Dodge, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

At the beginning of each new year people around the world express their hopes and desires for seemingly elusive peace on earth. In the past year there have been many strides toward that goal. The greatest threat to peace and our survival, nuclear weapons, are at long last on the road to abolition. The people have spoken and leaders have heard. This new year we must recommit to the steps necessary to make this a reality.

In the words of Pope Francis,

Nuclear weapons are a global problem, affecting all nations, and impacting future generations and the planet that is our home. A global ethic is needed if we are to reduce the nuclear threat and work towards nuclear disarmament.

Governor Cuomo late last night vetoed a bill drafted by the correction officers’ union that seeks to protect guards from prosecution for acts of brutality against inmates at Rikers Island facilities. The bill would have given the Queens District Attorney exclusive jurisdiction in such cases.

“We’re relieved that Gov. Cuomo has put the health and safety of people, kids and even prison guards at Rikers Island over the political gamesmanship of the Correction Officers’ Benevolent Association,” said NYCLU Executive Director Donna Lieberman. “We need more accountability at Rikers, not less, and a wholesale reform of the culture of corruption and abuse that has gone on for too long."

I would like to write a poem and nail it
to a stake at humanity’s crossroads.
It would say: choose your path wisely.

It would say: this path we are on is far
too treacherous, a trap for the unwary
and complacent.