Saturday, 18 April 2015 / TRUTH-OUT.ORG

Speakout

SpeakOut is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. SpeakOut articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

Dec 05

Madame Hillary Her Public Trifecta

By RA Monaco, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

The president she served, the president she married and the president she might become constitute the unfolding story arc of Hillary Clinton's life - an evolving narrative that will continue to capture the attention of the entire world. What does her very public trifecta-in-life tell us about the kind of world leader Madame Hillary might become? There is plenty to ponder over the span of these phases in Hillary's life, not the least of which is what can be reasonably inferred from her relationships?

If you're a questioning thinker, then you'll likely accept also that gender introduces a complex dynamic - a so-called "third-wave" feminism. A pent-up social movement that's not completely dissimilar to the movement that elected the first African-American president in 2008.

Black people cannot afford to be numb to the growing instances of police killing unarmed young black women and men in this country.

Jamala Rogers, a longtime human rights and racial justice activist with the St. Louis based Organization for Black Struggle (OBS) hit the nail on the head when she labeled the Grand Jury Report by St. Louis County Prosecutor Robert McCulloch “Hurricane McCulloch.” To those who demanded an indictment be brought against Darren Wilson, that is certainly what it felt like.

If the Grand Jury “No True Bill” decision was a hurricane, then the resistance in the streets currently sweeping the nation is disaster relief.

On 28 November 2014, a white, allegedly right-wing terrorist fired over 100 bullets at government buildings in the heart of Austin, Texas, before trying to burn down the Mexican consulate. USA Today indicates that the shooter, 49-year-old Larry Steven McQuilliams, likely had anti-government motives. According to Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo:

Between about 2:20 a.m. and 2:30 a.m. CT, McQuilliams fired at several buildings in downtown Austin, including police headquarters and the federal courthouse. He also tried to torch the Mexican consulate using several small propane cylinders, but the fires were put out before the flames could spread.

Dec 04

It's Mourning Again in America

By Laila Kabbaj, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

From Emmett Till, to Sean Bell, Trayvon Martin, to Michael Brown.

It’s mourning again in America.

Another solidarity protest was staged in downtown Seattle on December 1 to demonstrate against the grand jury decision in Ferguson, Missouri. Protesters held signs memorializing Michael Brown who was killed by police officer Darren Wilson.

At 6PM a rally was held at Westlake mall near the giant Christmas tree and across the street from the traditional holiday carousel. While the carousel's sound system played cheerful Christmas songs ("A beautiful sight, we're happy tonight…") angry protesters held a rally outside the mall. Police and security closed down the mall before the rally and Seattle riot police gathered on the ground floor.

More than anything, the Public Health crisis of the Ebola virus underscores the need for a universal model of healthcare that covers the health needs of all. Failure to provide needed health care to some quickly jeopardizes the health of all. Past president of the American Public Health Association Dr. Walter Tsou observes, "One out of every seven Americans are uninsured and the Affordable Care Act specifically exempts immigrants from obtaining insurance." Those who cannot access health care when they feel sick are at risk in a health care crisis, even as they place others at risk.

An Ebola-like crisis accentuates the fragmented piecemeal nature of US health coverage and access. Americans are stuck between a rock and a hard place - some forced to buy insurance that they are unable to use because they cannot afford high deductibles and copays.

We are able to split the atom and fly to the moon, yet we have difficulty living in peace with one another. Peace should hence be at the forefront of education and human existence.

A new horizon is on its way; one of hope, dignity and peace. Humanity's suffering and war and conflict-time experiences could pave a way to sustainability, interconnectivity and people's harmonious coexistence. Is this a utopian dream? This is hardly the case, as if we are to survive as one human family; we must come together and live in peace.

Most in the peace and justice community took it as a foregone conclusion that Darren Wilson wouldn’t be indicted by the system of injustice that he was a part of.  We had hoped somehow for a miracle, that the system and the culture that reinforces it would indict itself.  What we need instead are civilian indictments of the system - many of them.  Communities all across the country need to hold a candle of justice up to our legal system and call it what it is: polarizing, fear-based, classist and racist.  Indictments from civil society - when presented and argued with civility and reason could have real moral authority.  And while the outcomes of these indictments and the civilian tribunals that could follow may not be enforceable under current law, they provide grounding for the establishment of just and moral local communities.  

Local communities can design alternative systems for justice and nonviolently refuse to participate in the morally bankrupt systems that currently rule.   In moving to a peaceful future we need to experiment and establish these alternative models and inquire into the foundations of justice.  Restorative justice programs are already in operation across the country proving there are functional and effective alternatives to what currently is and showing what an ethically based system of justice can look like.  At the local community level this is a viable possibility we need to pursue.

The Obama administration has today appealed against a federal judge’s ruling that videotapes showing force-feeding of a Guantanamo prisoner should be released.

The ruling, made by Judge Gladys Kessler in October this year, was the first of its kind and came after sixteen major US media organizations, including the New York TimesAP, and McClatchy newspapers, asked for the tapes to be made public under the First Amendment of the US Constitution.

On Saturday, November 30, 2014, an Egyptian judge dropped all charges against former Egyptian strongman Hosni Mubarak. Mubarak, with US government military and political support, had presided over nearly three decades of martial law and repression. His overthrow and arrest in 2011 had been considered a major achievements of the "Arab Spring" in Egypt, a mass upsurge that began on January 25, 2011 and led to Mubarak's overthrow on February 11, 2011. Mubarak, along with others also released on Saturday, had subsequently been tried and convicted of a number of corruption and criminal charges. 

One activist told a US reporter that Mubarak's release is "closing the fate of the January 25, 2011 'revolution.'" Another man, whose son was one of the hundreds of protesters murdered by Mubarak's police during the uprising, put it this way: "Mubarak's regime is still in place. The January Revolution is over." 

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Speakout

SpeakOut is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. SpeakOut articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

Dec 05

Madame Hillary Her Public Trifecta

By RA Monaco, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

The president she served, the president she married and the president she might become constitute the unfolding story arc of Hillary Clinton's life - an evolving narrative that will continue to capture the attention of the entire world. What does her very public trifecta-in-life tell us about the kind of world leader Madame Hillary might become? There is plenty to ponder over the span of these phases in Hillary's life, not the least of which is what can be reasonably inferred from her relationships?

If you're a questioning thinker, then you'll likely accept also that gender introduces a complex dynamic - a so-called "third-wave" feminism. A pent-up social movement that's not completely dissimilar to the movement that elected the first African-American president in 2008.

Black people cannot afford to be numb to the growing instances of police killing unarmed young black women and men in this country.

Jamala Rogers, a longtime human rights and racial justice activist with the St. Louis based Organization for Black Struggle (OBS) hit the nail on the head when she labeled the Grand Jury Report by St. Louis County Prosecutor Robert McCulloch “Hurricane McCulloch.” To those who demanded an indictment be brought against Darren Wilson, that is certainly what it felt like.

If the Grand Jury “No True Bill” decision was a hurricane, then the resistance in the streets currently sweeping the nation is disaster relief.

On 28 November 2014, a white, allegedly right-wing terrorist fired over 100 bullets at government buildings in the heart of Austin, Texas, before trying to burn down the Mexican consulate. USA Today indicates that the shooter, 49-year-old Larry Steven McQuilliams, likely had anti-government motives. According to Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo:

Between about 2:20 a.m. and 2:30 a.m. CT, McQuilliams fired at several buildings in downtown Austin, including police headquarters and the federal courthouse. He also tried to torch the Mexican consulate using several small propane cylinders, but the fires were put out before the flames could spread.

Dec 04

It's Mourning Again in America

By Laila Kabbaj, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

From Emmett Till, to Sean Bell, Trayvon Martin, to Michael Brown.

It’s mourning again in America.

Another solidarity protest was staged in downtown Seattle on December 1 to demonstrate against the grand jury decision in Ferguson, Missouri. Protesters held signs memorializing Michael Brown who was killed by police officer Darren Wilson.

At 6PM a rally was held at Westlake mall near the giant Christmas tree and across the street from the traditional holiday carousel. While the carousel's sound system played cheerful Christmas songs ("A beautiful sight, we're happy tonight…") angry protesters held a rally outside the mall. Police and security closed down the mall before the rally and Seattle riot police gathered on the ground floor.

More than anything, the Public Health crisis of the Ebola virus underscores the need for a universal model of healthcare that covers the health needs of all. Failure to provide needed health care to some quickly jeopardizes the health of all. Past president of the American Public Health Association Dr. Walter Tsou observes, "One out of every seven Americans are uninsured and the Affordable Care Act specifically exempts immigrants from obtaining insurance." Those who cannot access health care when they feel sick are at risk in a health care crisis, even as they place others at risk.

An Ebola-like crisis accentuates the fragmented piecemeal nature of US health coverage and access. Americans are stuck between a rock and a hard place - some forced to buy insurance that they are unable to use because they cannot afford high deductibles and copays.

We are able to split the atom and fly to the moon, yet we have difficulty living in peace with one another. Peace should hence be at the forefront of education and human existence.

A new horizon is on its way; one of hope, dignity and peace. Humanity's suffering and war and conflict-time experiences could pave a way to sustainability, interconnectivity and people's harmonious coexistence. Is this a utopian dream? This is hardly the case, as if we are to survive as one human family; we must come together and live in peace.

Most in the peace and justice community took it as a foregone conclusion that Darren Wilson wouldn’t be indicted by the system of injustice that he was a part of.  We had hoped somehow for a miracle, that the system and the culture that reinforces it would indict itself.  What we need instead are civilian indictments of the system - many of them.  Communities all across the country need to hold a candle of justice up to our legal system and call it what it is: polarizing, fear-based, classist and racist.  Indictments from civil society - when presented and argued with civility and reason could have real moral authority.  And while the outcomes of these indictments and the civilian tribunals that could follow may not be enforceable under current law, they provide grounding for the establishment of just and moral local communities.  

Local communities can design alternative systems for justice and nonviolently refuse to participate in the morally bankrupt systems that currently rule.   In moving to a peaceful future we need to experiment and establish these alternative models and inquire into the foundations of justice.  Restorative justice programs are already in operation across the country proving there are functional and effective alternatives to what currently is and showing what an ethically based system of justice can look like.  At the local community level this is a viable possibility we need to pursue.

The Obama administration has today appealed against a federal judge’s ruling that videotapes showing force-feeding of a Guantanamo prisoner should be released.

The ruling, made by Judge Gladys Kessler in October this year, was the first of its kind and came after sixteen major US media organizations, including the New York TimesAP, and McClatchy newspapers, asked for the tapes to be made public under the First Amendment of the US Constitution.

On Saturday, November 30, 2014, an Egyptian judge dropped all charges against former Egyptian strongman Hosni Mubarak. Mubarak, with US government military and political support, had presided over nearly three decades of martial law and repression. His overthrow and arrest in 2011 had been considered a major achievements of the "Arab Spring" in Egypt, a mass upsurge that began on January 25, 2011 and led to Mubarak's overthrow on February 11, 2011. Mubarak, along with others also released on Saturday, had subsequently been tried and convicted of a number of corruption and criminal charges. 

One activist told a US reporter that Mubarak's release is "closing the fate of the January 25, 2011 'revolution.'" Another man, whose son was one of the hundreds of protesters murdered by Mubarak's police during the uprising, put it this way: "Mubarak's regime is still in place. The January Revolution is over."