Thursday, 28 July 2016 / TRUTH-OUT.ORG

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Speakout

Speakout is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. Speakout articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

People continue to be amazed that Sen. Bernie Sanders has been doing so well during the primaries in running as a candidate for president -- the dark horse coming up from behind and continuing to win more and more states, despite all that was done to thwart him. The media pundits are surprised because they don't understand the age divide that separates them from younger people. All the reasons given to not vote for Bernie Sanders do not apply to the younger generation. Here's why. There are four key aspects to the divide that influence how people of different generations might view socialism, Judaism, being old and having hope.

Jun 22

Constructive Responses to ISIS

By Will Hopkins, Speakout | Op-Ed

As a former soldier who lives with the memories of a year of infantry combat in Iraq, I am alarmed by the rise of ISIS (also known as Daesh), but I am equally alarmed by the lack of significant thought that has been given into what our response should be; in particular from the presidential candidates who were vying to be the decision maker who will have to see us through this crisis. Here in New Hampshire, we heard a uniform message: "As President, I will crush ISIS!" This conclusion about how to deal with ISIS would perhaps begin to shift if we asked a few pointed questions.

Jun 21

Puerto Rico Needs a Paradigm Shift

By Nelson A. Denis, Truthout | Op-Ed

On May 31, 2016, The New York Times published "How to Save Puerto Rico," wherein the Times' editorial board encouraged the passage of HR 5278 and the imposition of a Financial Oversight and Management Board in Puerto Rico. The editorial board acknowledged that the bill "has flaws," is "facing opposition on many fronts," has disturbing labor provisions and installs a board that will "override many decisions made by the island's elected lawmakers" and may resort to "old policies that have proved to be unworkable."

Jun 21

Why Go to Russia?

By Kathy Kelly, Speakout | Op-Ed

Since 1983, Sharon Tennison has worked to develop ordinary citizens' capacities to avert international crises, focusing on relations between the US and Russia. Now, amid a rising crisis in relations between the US and Russia, she has organized a delegation which assembled in Moscow on June 16 for a two week visit.  I joined the group on Thursday, and happened to finish reading Sharon Tennison's book, The Power of Impossible Ideas, when I landed in Moscow.

After her victories against Bernie Sanders in the California and New Jersey primaries, Hillary Clinton is the presumptive Democratic nominee, but her road to the White House is paved with major obstacles. Clinton is facing two enemies at once: Republican candidate Donald Trump on the right, and the mass movement created by the Sanders campaign on the left. The presidential race is morphing from a contest between Republicans and Democrats, into a dramatic clash between the establishment, embodied by Clinton, and the mass dissent rallying around Trump and Sanders.

Jun 20

The 1% Have Always Ruled the United States

By David Rosen, Speakout | News Analysis

Inequality is a central issue in the 2016 presidential campaign -- at least among the Democratic candidates. The role of the 1% became a political issue when the Occupy Wall Street movement highlighted it in the wake of the 2007-2009 Great Recession. Its continuing political significance is testimony to that fact that so many Americans are suffering in an economic system that has left wages stagnant for four decades, mounting personal debt and a bleak-looking future. 

Jun 17

The Emancipation of the Minority Academic

By Christine Ngaruiya, Speakout | Op-Ed

Walking the campus of my alma mater this past graduation week reminded me of how the elation of that special weekend felt for me. I was, however, also sobered as I looked around at the faces that I saw represented by the young graduates streaming around me along the busy sidewalks -- with a striking lack of change in diversity. I completed my undergraduate and medical school degrees in the heart of the Midwest. Returning to the US for college, after nearly a decade in Africa with my family, I was wide-eyed at the glaring homogeneity of my classmates when I first walked into class.

Jun 17

Rasmea Odeh Case Moves Toward Retrial

By Jimmy Johnson, Speakout | Report

More than 100 supporters rallied outside the US District Court in Detroit, Michigan, on Monday, June 13, in support of Palestinian activist Rasmea Odeh. Odeh and her legal team were in court for a hearing about whether Odeh will be allowed to testify about evidence excluded from her earlier trial. Odeh was convicted in November 2014, of an immigration fraud charge. Prosecutors alleged that Odeh broke US immigration law when she did not disclose that an Israeli military court imprisoned her in 1969.

For those who aren't familiar with Milo Yiannopoulos, allow me to brighten up your day. Yiannopoulos is an "alternative right" (or "alt-right") provocateur who hates feminism and the Black Lives Matter movement, and is currently embarked on his "Dangerous F*ggot Tour" across college campuses. (Yiannopoulos is openly gay, a freedom hard-won by progressive activists.) His rhetorical strategy is to use hyperbolic language and outrageous insults -- usually playing on gender and racial stereotypes -- to inflame the emotions of "regressive leftists" who have boisterously protested his talks, interrupted him while speaking and even caused some of his events to be cancelled.

Cost effectiveness analysis (CEA), as applied to health care, attempts to estimate the value of expenditures on procedures or treatments that is returned to patients, such as longer life, better quality of life, or both. Given that the US has the most expensive health care in the world, with comparatively low value and outcomes compared to many other advanced countries, you would think that CEA would be a major part of health policy in this country. Sadly, the opposite is true, and it is notably absent from the way we do things.

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Featured On Speakout

Speakout

Speakout is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. Speakout articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

People continue to be amazed that Sen. Bernie Sanders has been doing so well during the primaries in running as a candidate for president -- the dark horse coming up from behind and continuing to win more and more states, despite all that was done to thwart him. The media pundits are surprised because they don't understand the age divide that separates them from younger people. All the reasons given to not vote for Bernie Sanders do not apply to the younger generation. Here's why. There are four key aspects to the divide that influence how people of different generations might view socialism, Judaism, being old and having hope.

Jun 22

Constructive Responses to ISIS

By Will Hopkins, Speakout | Op-Ed

As a former soldier who lives with the memories of a year of infantry combat in Iraq, I am alarmed by the rise of ISIS (also known as Daesh), but I am equally alarmed by the lack of significant thought that has been given into what our response should be; in particular from the presidential candidates who were vying to be the decision maker who will have to see us through this crisis. Here in New Hampshire, we heard a uniform message: "As President, I will crush ISIS!" This conclusion about how to deal with ISIS would perhaps begin to shift if we asked a few pointed questions.

Jun 21

Puerto Rico Needs a Paradigm Shift

By Nelson A. Denis, Truthout | Op-Ed

On May 31, 2016, The New York Times published "How to Save Puerto Rico," wherein the Times' editorial board encouraged the passage of HR 5278 and the imposition of a Financial Oversight and Management Board in Puerto Rico. The editorial board acknowledged that the bill "has flaws," is "facing opposition on many fronts," has disturbing labor provisions and installs a board that will "override many decisions made by the island's elected lawmakers" and may resort to "old policies that have proved to be unworkable."

Jun 21

Why Go to Russia?

By Kathy Kelly, Speakout | Op-Ed

Since 1983, Sharon Tennison has worked to develop ordinary citizens' capacities to avert international crises, focusing on relations between the US and Russia. Now, amid a rising crisis in relations between the US and Russia, she has organized a delegation which assembled in Moscow on June 16 for a two week visit.  I joined the group on Thursday, and happened to finish reading Sharon Tennison's book, The Power of Impossible Ideas, when I landed in Moscow.

After her victories against Bernie Sanders in the California and New Jersey primaries, Hillary Clinton is the presumptive Democratic nominee, but her road to the White House is paved with major obstacles. Clinton is facing two enemies at once: Republican candidate Donald Trump on the right, and the mass movement created by the Sanders campaign on the left. The presidential race is morphing from a contest between Republicans and Democrats, into a dramatic clash between the establishment, embodied by Clinton, and the mass dissent rallying around Trump and Sanders.

Jun 20

The 1% Have Always Ruled the United States

By David Rosen, Speakout | News Analysis

Inequality is a central issue in the 2016 presidential campaign -- at least among the Democratic candidates. The role of the 1% became a political issue when the Occupy Wall Street movement highlighted it in the wake of the 2007-2009 Great Recession. Its continuing political significance is testimony to that fact that so many Americans are suffering in an economic system that has left wages stagnant for four decades, mounting personal debt and a bleak-looking future. 

Jun 17

The Emancipation of the Minority Academic

By Christine Ngaruiya, Speakout | Op-Ed

Walking the campus of my alma mater this past graduation week reminded me of how the elation of that special weekend felt for me. I was, however, also sobered as I looked around at the faces that I saw represented by the young graduates streaming around me along the busy sidewalks -- with a striking lack of change in diversity. I completed my undergraduate and medical school degrees in the heart of the Midwest. Returning to the US for college, after nearly a decade in Africa with my family, I was wide-eyed at the glaring homogeneity of my classmates when I first walked into class.

Jun 17

Rasmea Odeh Case Moves Toward Retrial

By Jimmy Johnson, Speakout | Report

More than 100 supporters rallied outside the US District Court in Detroit, Michigan, on Monday, June 13, in support of Palestinian activist Rasmea Odeh. Odeh and her legal team were in court for a hearing about whether Odeh will be allowed to testify about evidence excluded from her earlier trial. Odeh was convicted in November 2014, of an immigration fraud charge. Prosecutors alleged that Odeh broke US immigration law when she did not disclose that an Israeli military court imprisoned her in 1969.

For those who aren't familiar with Milo Yiannopoulos, allow me to brighten up your day. Yiannopoulos is an "alternative right" (or "alt-right") provocateur who hates feminism and the Black Lives Matter movement, and is currently embarked on his "Dangerous F*ggot Tour" across college campuses. (Yiannopoulos is openly gay, a freedom hard-won by progressive activists.) His rhetorical strategy is to use hyperbolic language and outrageous insults -- usually playing on gender and racial stereotypes -- to inflame the emotions of "regressive leftists" who have boisterously protested his talks, interrupted him while speaking and even caused some of his events to be cancelled.

Cost effectiveness analysis (CEA), as applied to health care, attempts to estimate the value of expenditures on procedures or treatments that is returned to patients, such as longer life, better quality of life, or both. Given that the US has the most expensive health care in the world, with comparatively low value and outcomes compared to many other advanced countries, you would think that CEA would be a major part of health policy in this country. Sadly, the opposite is true, and it is notably absent from the way we do things.