Saturday, 04 July 2015 / TRUTH-OUT.ORG

Speakout

SpeakOut is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. SpeakOut articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

On December 29, the Vermont Yankee nuclear reactor was shut down for good, cancelled 18 years before its license expired. The shutdown comes after thousands of protest actions; widespread uncontrolled leaks of radioactive tritium; the shocking collapse of a cooling tower, operator mismanagement, lying and cover-ups, and the state legislature’s 2010 passage of a “shut-down by 2012” law¾a statute later voided by a federal court. Entergy Corp.’s surrender announcement mentioned only “economic concerns.”

Safety conscious Vermonters stood up and sat-in, petitioned, lobbied and blocked the gates for decades, working to see the 42-year-old unit shuttered. The “Shut It Down” affinity group was arrested over and over protesting the rickety operation they called a public health hazard akin to reckless endangerment. The legislature’s decision came in February 2010, and that November Entergy unsuccessfully put the wreck up for sale. Critics mockingly put a bogus “For Sale” ad on the Web, calling the reactor a “quaint Vermont fixer-upper from the last millennium” with “tasty, pre-tritiated drinking water.”

"The ideological deficiency, not to say the total lack of ideology, within the national liberation movements - which is basically due to ignorance of the historical reality which these movements claim to transform - constitutes one of the greatest weaknesses of our struggle against imperialism, if not the greatest weakness of all."[1] - Amilcar Cabral

What is it about the term "capitalism" that inspires many of us to not call its name in vain and in the public square? Why is it that many of us will openly and forcefully critique "classism" but enthusiastically shy away from condemning capitalism in the same way? After all, we do publicly name and slam racism, homophobia or heterosexism, ageism, patriarchy or sexism and ableism. How effective will we be in organizing and rallying the oppressed against economic exploitation without naming the system that is brutalizing the majority?

Stop the NYPD Coup and Create the Police-Community Relationship We Want to See

Do the police serve the city or are they a law unto themselves? This is an issue of concern throughout the country but it has come into crisp focus in New York.

The conflict in New York City spurred by the death of Eric Garner and the failure of a Staten Island grand jury to indict the police officer who choked him to death; followed by the killing of two police officers, Officers Rafael Ramos and Wenjian Liu, by a deranged person has sharpened the conflict over policing in New York. The NYPD is trying to bully Mayor Bill de Blasio as they have done with almost all previous mayors. It is time for the mayor and city to stand up to police bullying.

Ameer Makhoul, a Palestinian Israeli Christian and director of Ittijah, the Haifa-based Union of Arab Community-Based Associations, a network of Palestinian NGOs, was arrested by the Israeli government in 2010. He was accused of being a spy for Hezbollah. Makhoul squarely denied the charges, yet accepted a nine-year plea deal. Like so many political prisoners, frightened by the draconian life sentence with which he was threatened, Makhoul chose to confess to a crime he did not commit, rather than try to achieve justice in a two-tiered system in which, in the words of leading Israeli newspaper Haaretz, [v]irtually all – 99.74%, to be exact – of cases heard by the military courts in the [illegally occupied Palestinian] territories end in a conviction, according to data in the military courts' annual report.

It is quite likely that Israeli forces also illegally resorted to torture to force Makhoul to falsely confess. His lawyers stated he was tortured during his detention, and that interrogators told him they would render him disabled if he did not give in. Amnesty International said Makhoul's jailing is a very disturbing development, indicating Ameer Makhoul is well known for his human rights activism on behalf of Palestinians in Israel and those living under Israeli occupation. We fear that this may be the underlying reason for his imprisonment.

Jan 08

Renewable Energy for National Security

By Benjamin Dancer, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

What would happen if the power went out for good? It's not a question many of us contemplate, probably because the answer is not reassuring.

It turns out that the power grid is quite vulnerable. There are a number of realistic scenarios that could bring it down, not just for a few days, but indefinitely. In addition to that, modern civilization depends on electricity. That is not a figure of speech. We have come to depend on electricity for food and water.

Jan 08

Change Greece - Change Europe - Change4all!

By Dino Abazovic et al., SpeakOut | Open Letter

300 intellectuals, trade unionists, artists and activists from all over the world, have launched an appeal uniting their voices to say: We will defend the right of the Greek people to make their decisions freely; to break with austerity; to say 'no' to the humanitarian crisis which has plagued the country; to pave the way for a real alternative for Greece – for a social and democratic reorientation.

Jan 08

The Moral Voice of Rural People

By Evaggelos Vallianatos, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

Rural Coalition

The Rural Coalition is a non-profit organization in Washington, DC, assisting impoverished rural people and farmers in the United States and Mexico, especially in the United States.

I went to Mexico with the Rural Coalition. This gave me an opportunity to see first hand the struggle of indigenous people defending their land from the encroachment of the agribusiness-government complex. The Rural Coalition is symbolic of one of the greatest tragedies of the twentieth century: the undoing of rural societies and their replacement by agribusiness machines.

A few years ago, the team of organizers I work with was contacted by a local business owner. They were concerned about an email thread they had been a part of wherein the local business alliance was trying to recruit local merchants to attend the court hearing of a local houseless woman. That houseless woman, whose name was Jennifer, had lived in the community for years. She had a drinking problem and a number of emotional issues. She could be loud and, at times, insulting. Basically, she was bad for business, and when the business alliance heard that she was facing an open container charge, they decided to use that situation as leverage to remove her from the community.

The business owners involved hoped to get an injunction barring Jennifer from being in their business district. They thought the judge and prosecutor would be willing to broker that deal if enough of them packed the courtroom to speak out about all the trouble she caused. Upon reading this, we quickly realized we needed to pack the courtroom with community opposition to this proposed exile. That task proved much easier than you’d imagine, as Jennifer was actually quite loved by a number of people in our neighborhood.

It was the moment many had been waiting for. On January 2, Palestine’s United Nations envoy, Riyad Mansour formally requested membership at the International Criminal Court (ICC).

"We are seeking justice for all the victims that have been killed by Israel, the occupying power," he said.

Jan 07

#BlackLivesMatter: Because to Many, They Don't

By Stephanie Panousieris, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

For the past few months, news feeds and timelines have filled up with opinions about the current #BlackLivesMatter movement gaining strength and solidarity across the country. The deaths of Michael BrownEric GarnerAkai GurleyTamir RiceKajieme Powell, and the growing list of unarmed people of color killed at the hands of law enforcement have sparked an important conversation about targeted, aggressive, and racialized encounters between police and the black community. The increased militarization of the police force, use of mass incarceration and excessive sentencing and the prevalence of the politics of fear against communities of color so deeply embedded into our public consciousness are all being brought to the forefront of a national conversation about race and justice.

If you choose to engage with or participate in this growing conversation, you do not have to look very long or very hard to understand that Americans are not terribly comfortable with facing our nation's history of racial injustice and its legacy in modernity. It is truly astonishing to read the opinions so bravely put forth from behind the veil of anonymity and protection of a computer screen, where the vast majority of contributors enter online conversations confidently, armed with definitive and defensive conclusions about racialized policing. Yet this argumentative rhetoric is often just an echo of the opinions set forth on the nightly news cycle of one's choice, and it is obvious that we are much more comfortable challenging the reality of a difficult history than engaging with its consequences.

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Speakout

SpeakOut is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. SpeakOut articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

On December 29, the Vermont Yankee nuclear reactor was shut down for good, cancelled 18 years before its license expired. The shutdown comes after thousands of protest actions; widespread uncontrolled leaks of radioactive tritium; the shocking collapse of a cooling tower, operator mismanagement, lying and cover-ups, and the state legislature’s 2010 passage of a “shut-down by 2012” law¾a statute later voided by a federal court. Entergy Corp.’s surrender announcement mentioned only “economic concerns.”

Safety conscious Vermonters stood up and sat-in, petitioned, lobbied and blocked the gates for decades, working to see the 42-year-old unit shuttered. The “Shut It Down” affinity group was arrested over and over protesting the rickety operation they called a public health hazard akin to reckless endangerment. The legislature’s decision came in February 2010, and that November Entergy unsuccessfully put the wreck up for sale. Critics mockingly put a bogus “For Sale” ad on the Web, calling the reactor a “quaint Vermont fixer-upper from the last millennium” with “tasty, pre-tritiated drinking water.”

"The ideological deficiency, not to say the total lack of ideology, within the national liberation movements - which is basically due to ignorance of the historical reality which these movements claim to transform - constitutes one of the greatest weaknesses of our struggle against imperialism, if not the greatest weakness of all."[1] - Amilcar Cabral

What is it about the term "capitalism" that inspires many of us to not call its name in vain and in the public square? Why is it that many of us will openly and forcefully critique "classism" but enthusiastically shy away from condemning capitalism in the same way? After all, we do publicly name and slam racism, homophobia or heterosexism, ageism, patriarchy or sexism and ableism. How effective will we be in organizing and rallying the oppressed against economic exploitation without naming the system that is brutalizing the majority?

Stop the NYPD Coup and Create the Police-Community Relationship We Want to See

Do the police serve the city or are they a law unto themselves? This is an issue of concern throughout the country but it has come into crisp focus in New York.

The conflict in New York City spurred by the death of Eric Garner and the failure of a Staten Island grand jury to indict the police officer who choked him to death; followed by the killing of two police officers, Officers Rafael Ramos and Wenjian Liu, by a deranged person has sharpened the conflict over policing in New York. The NYPD is trying to bully Mayor Bill de Blasio as they have done with almost all previous mayors. It is time for the mayor and city to stand up to police bullying.

Ameer Makhoul, a Palestinian Israeli Christian and director of Ittijah, the Haifa-based Union of Arab Community-Based Associations, a network of Palestinian NGOs, was arrested by the Israeli government in 2010. He was accused of being a spy for Hezbollah. Makhoul squarely denied the charges, yet accepted a nine-year plea deal. Like so many political prisoners, frightened by the draconian life sentence with which he was threatened, Makhoul chose to confess to a crime he did not commit, rather than try to achieve justice in a two-tiered system in which, in the words of leading Israeli newspaper Haaretz, [v]irtually all – 99.74%, to be exact – of cases heard by the military courts in the [illegally occupied Palestinian] territories end in a conviction, according to data in the military courts' annual report.

It is quite likely that Israeli forces also illegally resorted to torture to force Makhoul to falsely confess. His lawyers stated he was tortured during his detention, and that interrogators told him they would render him disabled if he did not give in. Amnesty International said Makhoul's jailing is a very disturbing development, indicating Ameer Makhoul is well known for his human rights activism on behalf of Palestinians in Israel and those living under Israeli occupation. We fear that this may be the underlying reason for his imprisonment.

Jan 08

Renewable Energy for National Security

By Benjamin Dancer, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

What would happen if the power went out for good? It's not a question many of us contemplate, probably because the answer is not reassuring.

It turns out that the power grid is quite vulnerable. There are a number of realistic scenarios that could bring it down, not just for a few days, but indefinitely. In addition to that, modern civilization depends on electricity. That is not a figure of speech. We have come to depend on electricity for food and water.

Jan 08

Change Greece - Change Europe - Change4all!

By Dino Abazovic et al., SpeakOut | Open Letter

300 intellectuals, trade unionists, artists and activists from all over the world, have launched an appeal uniting their voices to say: We will defend the right of the Greek people to make their decisions freely; to break with austerity; to say 'no' to the humanitarian crisis which has plagued the country; to pave the way for a real alternative for Greece – for a social and democratic reorientation.

Jan 08

The Moral Voice of Rural People

By Evaggelos Vallianatos, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

Rural Coalition

The Rural Coalition is a non-profit organization in Washington, DC, assisting impoverished rural people and farmers in the United States and Mexico, especially in the United States.

I went to Mexico with the Rural Coalition. This gave me an opportunity to see first hand the struggle of indigenous people defending their land from the encroachment of the agribusiness-government complex. The Rural Coalition is symbolic of one of the greatest tragedies of the twentieth century: the undoing of rural societies and their replacement by agribusiness machines.

A few years ago, the team of organizers I work with was contacted by a local business owner. They were concerned about an email thread they had been a part of wherein the local business alliance was trying to recruit local merchants to attend the court hearing of a local houseless woman. That houseless woman, whose name was Jennifer, had lived in the community for years. She had a drinking problem and a number of emotional issues. She could be loud and, at times, insulting. Basically, she was bad for business, and when the business alliance heard that she was facing an open container charge, they decided to use that situation as leverage to remove her from the community.

The business owners involved hoped to get an injunction barring Jennifer from being in their business district. They thought the judge and prosecutor would be willing to broker that deal if enough of them packed the courtroom to speak out about all the trouble she caused. Upon reading this, we quickly realized we needed to pack the courtroom with community opposition to this proposed exile. That task proved much easier than you’d imagine, as Jennifer was actually quite loved by a number of people in our neighborhood.

It was the moment many had been waiting for. On January 2, Palestine’s United Nations envoy, Riyad Mansour formally requested membership at the International Criminal Court (ICC).

"We are seeking justice for all the victims that have been killed by Israel, the occupying power," he said.

Jan 07

#BlackLivesMatter: Because to Many, They Don't

By Stephanie Panousieris, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

For the past few months, news feeds and timelines have filled up with opinions about the current #BlackLivesMatter movement gaining strength and solidarity across the country. The deaths of Michael BrownEric GarnerAkai GurleyTamir RiceKajieme Powell, and the growing list of unarmed people of color killed at the hands of law enforcement have sparked an important conversation about targeted, aggressive, and racialized encounters between police and the black community. The increased militarization of the police force, use of mass incarceration and excessive sentencing and the prevalence of the politics of fear against communities of color so deeply embedded into our public consciousness are all being brought to the forefront of a national conversation about race and justice.

If you choose to engage with or participate in this growing conversation, you do not have to look very long or very hard to understand that Americans are not terribly comfortable with facing our nation's history of racial injustice and its legacy in modernity. It is truly astonishing to read the opinions so bravely put forth from behind the veil of anonymity and protection of a computer screen, where the vast majority of contributors enter online conversations confidently, armed with definitive and defensive conclusions about racialized policing. Yet this argumentative rhetoric is often just an echo of the opinions set forth on the nightly news cycle of one's choice, and it is obvious that we are much more comfortable challenging the reality of a difficult history than engaging with its consequences.