Sunday, 24 July 2016 / TRUTH-OUT.ORG
  • Pokémon Go for Radicals

    Pokémon Go one-ups social media's ability to draw people out, given that it actually gets bodies moving and to a particular location. It's no replacement for well-timed mobilization, but it could offer much needed tools.

  • Trump's New Super PAC Attack Dog

    A pro-Donald Trump super PAC called Rebuilding America Now has positioned itself as an attack dog, unafraid to take shots at Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at a time when her campaign is dominating airwaves.

Speakout

Speakout is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. Speakout articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

The author examines a recently-released study from the US Government Accountability Office, titled: "Unmanned Aerial Systems: Actions Needed to Improve DOD Pilot Training." Below is a summary of his conclusions.

A new collection of specters haunts the earth: 72 workers killed May 13 in a slipper factory fire in the Valenzuela district of Manila. There was no accident. That fire and those workers burning to death are part of the brutal architecture of industrial production. Every report covers up more than it reveals, and the workers, charred beyond recognition, wait for nothing now.

The fire "started" when sparks set off an explosion. The slaughter of the innocents began long before the spark. The windows were covered, sealed tight, by metal gratings. Even now, the local mayor isn't sure the building had any fire escapes.

Today was an incredible step forward in the struggle to fully fund education in Washington state: our union, the Seattle Education Association (SEA), went on a one day strike, joining over 50 local educators' unions in a rolling strike wave to demand that the State Legislature spend billions of more dollars on the schools.

I have been part of a rank-and-file organization in Seattle called the Social Equality Educators (SEE) who have argued for years that if we want to achieve the schools our students deserve, we will have to take collective action to force those in power to back down.  We have helped organize collective action in the victorious MAP test boycott, the successful Garfield High School walkout against the proposed displacement of one of our teachers, and to support the mass boycotts of the SBAC testing this year.  However, we have said that if the union as a whole were to take up these struggles, the power of our thousands of  educators across the city would be strong enough to reverse the attack by the corporate education reformers.

Tyler Cowen warns readers in his Upshot piece that we may be entering a new era in which growth is weak and the bulk of the workforce, including those with college degrees, see stagnant or declining wages. The warning is well taken, but what's missing is a serious discussion of the policies that are driving this outcome.

Cowen begins his story by pointing out that universities are replacing tenured faculty with low-paid adjuncts. He points out that major manufacturers are doing something similar by paying new hires much less than their incumbent workforce. He could also point to the large number of people who end up working in low paying sectors like retail and restaurants, including many with college degrees.

The Cornucopia Institute harshly criticized the USDA for its failure to conduct an investigation of 14 legal complaints filed by the Wisconsin-based organic industry watchdog group last December. The complaints allege a systemic pattern of livestock management violations occurring on some of the nation's biggest certified organic "factory farm" poultry and dairy operations.

In their brief letter to Cornucopia, the National Organic Program's (NOP) director of Compliance and Enforcement stated that the agency "has determined that an investigation is unwarranted." Last December, after an investment of seven months and tens of thousands of dollars, Cornucopia filed 14 complaints with the NOP utilizing evidence primarily gathered through high resolution aerial photographic examinations of industrial-scale certified organic dairies and poultry operations. The hundreds of images taken documented an overwhelming absence of dairy cows on pasture, and the exclusive confinement of hundreds of thousands of egg laying hens and meat birds inside buildings.

Today'low-wage workers are both older and much better-educated than the average low-wage worker in the past. In theory, this should mean that these workers also earn much more the in the past. A high school degree, an associate's degree from a two year college, a bachelor's degree from a four year college or an advanced degree adds to a worker's skills. Likewise, each year of work experience also adds to a worker's skills. Strikingly, though, a new issue brief from the Center for Economic and Policy Research shows that low-wage workers have not seen a commensurate increase in pay.

"These workers have done all the things you would expect to make more money," said Cherrie Bucknor of CEPR and the author of the brief. "They have finished high school or gotten a degree and have work experience. Nevertheless, they still find themselves underpaid."

May 20

Motherhood Is a Right, Not a Duty

By Julia Evelyn Martínez, Rebellion | Op-Ed

Any analysis of motherhood must start from a double perspective. In the first place, motherhood must be considered as a biological function, linked to procreation, pregnancy and childbirth. In the second place, motherhood must be considered as a social practice that references all activities related to the daily task of caring for the life of sons and daughters, a task that can be carried out by either the biological mother or by other persons (men and women) capable and willing to perform such care.

From this perspective, motherhood is a complex experience, which when experienced in a holistic, planned, and safe manner, can become both a means of personal realization, as well as a means to guarantee the sustainability of life. On the other extreme, when motherhood is experienced as a duty and/or as the result of violent machismo, it can become a source of suffering and oppression for women.

On 24 May, thirty women peacebuilders will walk across the De-Militarized Zone that separates Korean families. Ann Wright describes her journey from serving in the US Army to citizen diplomat walking for peace.

Following my conscience to challenge US policies began with my resignation as a US diplomat in 2003 in opposition to the Bush war on Iraq. Before working as a diplomat I was a US Army Reserve Colonel. Over the past twelve years, myconscience has taken me on life's journey to see the effect of US policies on Gaza, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, Egypt, Tunisia, Cuba, El Salvador, Costa Rica and Iran. 

Carl Hart, PhD, a neuroscientist and associate professor of psychology and psychiatry at Columbia University, whose work has redefined how people are discussingaddiction, is today releasing two more groundbreaking and deeply compelling talks, one before a TEDMED audience in Northern California; and another a special Telephone Town Hall attended by hundreds of advocates, policymakers, faith leaders and medical professionals, and covered by Ebony.com, the leading AfricanAmerican news and lifestyle site.

Dr. Hart's TEDMED Talk brilliantly dispels the myths about drugs, and drug use and drug misuse—and how Black and poor communities in particular have been harmed as a result of our misinformation. It serves as a perfect companion to Hart's unflinching, eye-opening and best-selling memoir, High Price: A Neuroscientist's Journey of  Self-Discovery That Challenges Everything You Know About Drugs and Society (HarperCollins, 2013), which won the PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award. In High Price, Hart argues forcefully that what plagued poor Black communities during the 1980s was less crack-cocaine, than it was unemployment, racism and hopelessness.

May 20

Stop Using Me as Your Racist Scapegoat

By J. Mijin Cha, Truthout | Op-Ed

Duke University Professor Jerry Hough use of Asian Americans to denigrate the African American community uses Asians as a scapegoat for his plainly racist views. In response to a New York Times article detailing the racist policies impacting Baltimore, Hough commented that African-Americans were themselves to blame and that Asian-Americans had suffered racism but found a way to succeed because, "[T]hey didn't feel sorry for themselves, but worked doubly hard." Hough then went on to remark that Asians are successful because we have simple, old American first names and date/marry a lot of white people. If this is what passes as being accepted into white America, I think I'll pass.

The stereotype of the hardworking, successful Asian is a convenient way to gloss over increasing inequality within the Asian American/ Pacific Islander community. Poverty is growing rapidly within the AAPI community, especially among the native-born AAPI, but it is masked by the increase in high-earning AAPI. Though the number of AAPIs living in poverty increased more than 50 percent between 2000 and 2011, the overall poverty rate remained relatively unchanged due to the increase in the overall AAPI population, including large numbers of highly skilled, highly educated immigrants. The highly skilled Asians are Hough's chosen minority and the ones that are struggling are "feeling sorry for themselves."

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Speakout

Speakout is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. Speakout articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

The author examines a recently-released study from the US Government Accountability Office, titled: "Unmanned Aerial Systems: Actions Needed to Improve DOD Pilot Training." Below is a summary of his conclusions.

A new collection of specters haunts the earth: 72 workers killed May 13 in a slipper factory fire in the Valenzuela district of Manila. There was no accident. That fire and those workers burning to death are part of the brutal architecture of industrial production. Every report covers up more than it reveals, and the workers, charred beyond recognition, wait for nothing now.

The fire "started" when sparks set off an explosion. The slaughter of the innocents began long before the spark. The windows were covered, sealed tight, by metal gratings. Even now, the local mayor isn't sure the building had any fire escapes.

Today was an incredible step forward in the struggle to fully fund education in Washington state: our union, the Seattle Education Association (SEA), went on a one day strike, joining over 50 local educators' unions in a rolling strike wave to demand that the State Legislature spend billions of more dollars on the schools.

I have been part of a rank-and-file organization in Seattle called the Social Equality Educators (SEE) who have argued for years that if we want to achieve the schools our students deserve, we will have to take collective action to force those in power to back down.  We have helped organize collective action in the victorious MAP test boycott, the successful Garfield High School walkout against the proposed displacement of one of our teachers, and to support the mass boycotts of the SBAC testing this year.  However, we have said that if the union as a whole were to take up these struggles, the power of our thousands of  educators across the city would be strong enough to reverse the attack by the corporate education reformers.

Tyler Cowen warns readers in his Upshot piece that we may be entering a new era in which growth is weak and the bulk of the workforce, including those with college degrees, see stagnant or declining wages. The warning is well taken, but what's missing is a serious discussion of the policies that are driving this outcome.

Cowen begins his story by pointing out that universities are replacing tenured faculty with low-paid adjuncts. He points out that major manufacturers are doing something similar by paying new hires much less than their incumbent workforce. He could also point to the large number of people who end up working in low paying sectors like retail and restaurants, including many with college degrees.

The Cornucopia Institute harshly criticized the USDA for its failure to conduct an investigation of 14 legal complaints filed by the Wisconsin-based organic industry watchdog group last December. The complaints allege a systemic pattern of livestock management violations occurring on some of the nation's biggest certified organic "factory farm" poultry and dairy operations.

In their brief letter to Cornucopia, the National Organic Program's (NOP) director of Compliance and Enforcement stated that the agency "has determined that an investigation is unwarranted." Last December, after an investment of seven months and tens of thousands of dollars, Cornucopia filed 14 complaints with the NOP utilizing evidence primarily gathered through high resolution aerial photographic examinations of industrial-scale certified organic dairies and poultry operations. The hundreds of images taken documented an overwhelming absence of dairy cows on pasture, and the exclusive confinement of hundreds of thousands of egg laying hens and meat birds inside buildings.

Today'low-wage workers are both older and much better-educated than the average low-wage worker in the past. In theory, this should mean that these workers also earn much more the in the past. A high school degree, an associate's degree from a two year college, a bachelor's degree from a four year college or an advanced degree adds to a worker's skills. Likewise, each year of work experience also adds to a worker's skills. Strikingly, though, a new issue brief from the Center for Economic and Policy Research shows that low-wage workers have not seen a commensurate increase in pay.

"These workers have done all the things you would expect to make more money," said Cherrie Bucknor of CEPR and the author of the brief. "They have finished high school or gotten a degree and have work experience. Nevertheless, they still find themselves underpaid."

May 20

Motherhood Is a Right, Not a Duty

By Julia Evelyn Martínez, Rebellion | Op-Ed

Any analysis of motherhood must start from a double perspective. In the first place, motherhood must be considered as a biological function, linked to procreation, pregnancy and childbirth. In the second place, motherhood must be considered as a social practice that references all activities related to the daily task of caring for the life of sons and daughters, a task that can be carried out by either the biological mother or by other persons (men and women) capable and willing to perform such care.

From this perspective, motherhood is a complex experience, which when experienced in a holistic, planned, and safe manner, can become both a means of personal realization, as well as a means to guarantee the sustainability of life. On the other extreme, when motherhood is experienced as a duty and/or as the result of violent machismo, it can become a source of suffering and oppression for women.

On 24 May, thirty women peacebuilders will walk across the De-Militarized Zone that separates Korean families. Ann Wright describes her journey from serving in the US Army to citizen diplomat walking for peace.

Following my conscience to challenge US policies began with my resignation as a US diplomat in 2003 in opposition to the Bush war on Iraq. Before working as a diplomat I was a US Army Reserve Colonel. Over the past twelve years, myconscience has taken me on life's journey to see the effect of US policies on Gaza, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, Egypt, Tunisia, Cuba, El Salvador, Costa Rica and Iran. 

Carl Hart, PhD, a neuroscientist and associate professor of psychology and psychiatry at Columbia University, whose work has redefined how people are discussingaddiction, is today releasing two more groundbreaking and deeply compelling talks, one before a TEDMED audience in Northern California; and another a special Telephone Town Hall attended by hundreds of advocates, policymakers, faith leaders and medical professionals, and covered by Ebony.com, the leading AfricanAmerican news and lifestyle site.

Dr. Hart's TEDMED Talk brilliantly dispels the myths about drugs, and drug use and drug misuse—and how Black and poor communities in particular have been harmed as a result of our misinformation. It serves as a perfect companion to Hart's unflinching, eye-opening and best-selling memoir, High Price: A Neuroscientist's Journey of  Self-Discovery That Challenges Everything You Know About Drugs and Society (HarperCollins, 2013), which won the PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award. In High Price, Hart argues forcefully that what plagued poor Black communities during the 1980s was less crack-cocaine, than it was unemployment, racism and hopelessness.

May 20

Stop Using Me as Your Racist Scapegoat

By J. Mijin Cha, Truthout | Op-Ed

Duke University Professor Jerry Hough use of Asian Americans to denigrate the African American community uses Asians as a scapegoat for his plainly racist views. In response to a New York Times article detailing the racist policies impacting Baltimore, Hough commented that African-Americans were themselves to blame and that Asian-Americans had suffered racism but found a way to succeed because, "[T]hey didn't feel sorry for themselves, but worked doubly hard." Hough then went on to remark that Asians are successful because we have simple, old American first names and date/marry a lot of white people. If this is what passes as being accepted into white America, I think I'll pass.

The stereotype of the hardworking, successful Asian is a convenient way to gloss over increasing inequality within the Asian American/ Pacific Islander community. Poverty is growing rapidly within the AAPI community, especially among the native-born AAPI, but it is masked by the increase in high-earning AAPI. Though the number of AAPIs living in poverty increased more than 50 percent between 2000 and 2011, the overall poverty rate remained relatively unchanged due to the increase in the overall AAPI population, including large numbers of highly skilled, highly educated immigrants. The highly skilled Asians are Hough's chosen minority and the ones that are struggling are "feeling sorry for themselves."