Tuesday, 01 September 2015 / TRUTH-OUT.ORG

Speakout

Speakout is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. Speakout articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

Jan 08

Renewable Energy for National Security

By Benjamin Dancer, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

What would happen if the power went out for good? It's not a question many of us contemplate, probably because the answer is not reassuring.

It turns out that the power grid is quite vulnerable. There are a number of realistic scenarios that could bring it down, not just for a few days, but indefinitely. In addition to that, modern civilization depends on electricity. That is not a figure of speech. We have come to depend on electricity for food and water.

Jan 08

Change Greece - Change Europe - Change4all!

By Dino Abazovic et al., SpeakOut | Open Letter

300 intellectuals, trade unionists, artists and activists from all over the world, have launched an appeal uniting their voices to say: We will defend the right of the Greek people to make their decisions freely; to break with austerity; to say 'no' to the humanitarian crisis which has plagued the country; to pave the way for a real alternative for Greece – for a social and democratic reorientation.

Jan 08

The Moral Voice of Rural People

By Evaggelos Vallianatos, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

Rural Coalition

The Rural Coalition is a non-profit organization in Washington, DC, assisting impoverished rural people and farmers in the United States and Mexico, especially in the United States.

I went to Mexico with the Rural Coalition. This gave me an opportunity to see first hand the struggle of indigenous people defending their land from the encroachment of the agribusiness-government complex. The Rural Coalition is symbolic of one of the greatest tragedies of the twentieth century: the undoing of rural societies and their replacement by agribusiness machines.

A few years ago, the team of organizers I work with was contacted by a local business owner. They were concerned about an email thread they had been a part of wherein the local business alliance was trying to recruit local merchants to attend the court hearing of a local houseless woman. That houseless woman, whose name was Jennifer, had lived in the community for years. She had a drinking problem and a number of emotional issues. She could be loud and, at times, insulting. Basically, she was bad for business, and when the business alliance heard that she was facing an open container charge, they decided to use that situation as leverage to remove her from the community.

The business owners involved hoped to get an injunction barring Jennifer from being in their business district. They thought the judge and prosecutor would be willing to broker that deal if enough of them packed the courtroom to speak out about all the trouble she caused. Upon reading this, we quickly realized we needed to pack the courtroom with community opposition to this proposed exile. That task proved much easier than you’d imagine, as Jennifer was actually quite loved by a number of people in our neighborhood.

It was the moment many had been waiting for. On January 2, Palestine’s United Nations envoy, Riyad Mansour formally requested membership at the International Criminal Court (ICC).

"We are seeking justice for all the victims that have been killed by Israel, the occupying power," he said.

Jan 07

#BlackLivesMatter: Because to Many, They Don't

By Stephanie Panousieris, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

For the past few months, news feeds and timelines have filled up with opinions about the current #BlackLivesMatter movement gaining strength and solidarity across the country. The deaths of Michael BrownEric GarnerAkai GurleyTamir RiceKajieme Powell, and the growing list of unarmed people of color killed at the hands of law enforcement have sparked an important conversation about targeted, aggressive, and racialized encounters between police and the black community. The increased militarization of the police force, use of mass incarceration and excessive sentencing and the prevalence of the politics of fear against communities of color so deeply embedded into our public consciousness are all being brought to the forefront of a national conversation about race and justice.

If you choose to engage with or participate in this growing conversation, you do not have to look very long or very hard to understand that Americans are not terribly comfortable with facing our nation's history of racial injustice and its legacy in modernity. It is truly astonishing to read the opinions so bravely put forth from behind the veil of anonymity and protection of a computer screen, where the vast majority of contributors enter online conversations confidently, armed with definitive and defensive conclusions about racialized policing. Yet this argumentative rhetoric is often just an echo of the opinions set forth on the nightly news cycle of one's choice, and it is obvious that we are much more comfortable challenging the reality of a difficult history than engaging with its consequences.

It couldn't be known until now.

San Francisco Chronicle article on Jan. 1, 2015 has revealed that former US judges requested clemency for the Cuban Five in early 2014 by a letter hand-delivered to President Barack Obama.

Nine retired appellate court judges from California, Washington, Montana and Iowa submitted the Feb. 24, 2014 letter to Obama, urging clemency for the three remaining members of the Five, a deed that only became public after Gerardo Hernández, Ramón Labañino and Antonio Guerrero were home.

Jan 07

On Community, Redemption and Leadership

By Yusef Bunchy Shakur, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

Yusef Bunchy Shakur is a father, motivational speaker, entrepreneur, self-published author of three books (The Window 2 My SoulRedemptive Soul and My Soul Looks Back), documentary filmmaker (Detroit's Native Son) and community leader. Every year, he organizes a Restoring the Neighbor Back to the Hood event which feeds hundreds of families, provides clothing and hands out backpacks to over 500 kids. He was also wrongfully convicted in 1992 for assault in an unarmed robbery case and sentenced to a five-to-fifteen year term. He was 19 at the time and would serve 9 years, released ultimately in January of 2001. Since then, he has been at the forefront of resistance and restoration in Detroit.

Shakur spoke to Truthout about how he came to be in that position.

More than half a century ago, Hannah Arendt made an observation about aspects of human nature most people fail to acknowledge or confront. Arendt, a Jew who fled Germany during the Nazi's rise to power, survived to witness the trial of German Nazi Lieutenant Colonel Adolf Eichmann. She pointed to wartime atrocities where dutiful administrators like Eichmann become mass murderers with neither regret nor even conscious recognition of the routine horror they inflicted. She called it the "banality of evil" - a systemic evil that had become "terrifyingly normal."

Fascism comes in all shapes and forms. The late comedian George Carlin once pointed out that fascism will not come to America in "brown and black shirts" or "jack boots," but in "Nike sneakers and smiley shirts." With NSA mass surveillance and the recent Senate CIA torture report evidencing murder of innocent people in offshore US prisons, a kind of systematic evil is semi-secretly being carried out within present day society.

Jan 06

A Bad End to a Bad Year

By Dr. James J. Zogby, Truthout | Op-Ed

The closing weeks of 2014 spelled disaster for US leadership and the rule of law.

During the last two weeks of December, the US countered three different efforts designed to affirm Palestinian rights. It was unfortunate since in doing so the US undercut its stated commitments to uphold the rule of law in international relations and to support a non-violent resolution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

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Speakout

Speakout is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. Speakout articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

Jan 08

Renewable Energy for National Security

By Benjamin Dancer, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

What would happen if the power went out for good? It's not a question many of us contemplate, probably because the answer is not reassuring.

It turns out that the power grid is quite vulnerable. There are a number of realistic scenarios that could bring it down, not just for a few days, but indefinitely. In addition to that, modern civilization depends on electricity. That is not a figure of speech. We have come to depend on electricity for food and water.

Jan 08

Change Greece - Change Europe - Change4all!

By Dino Abazovic et al., SpeakOut | Open Letter

300 intellectuals, trade unionists, artists and activists from all over the world, have launched an appeal uniting their voices to say: We will defend the right of the Greek people to make their decisions freely; to break with austerity; to say 'no' to the humanitarian crisis which has plagued the country; to pave the way for a real alternative for Greece – for a social and democratic reorientation.

Jan 08

The Moral Voice of Rural People

By Evaggelos Vallianatos, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

Rural Coalition

The Rural Coalition is a non-profit organization in Washington, DC, assisting impoverished rural people and farmers in the United States and Mexico, especially in the United States.

I went to Mexico with the Rural Coalition. This gave me an opportunity to see first hand the struggle of indigenous people defending their land from the encroachment of the agribusiness-government complex. The Rural Coalition is symbolic of one of the greatest tragedies of the twentieth century: the undoing of rural societies and their replacement by agribusiness machines.

A few years ago, the team of organizers I work with was contacted by a local business owner. They were concerned about an email thread they had been a part of wherein the local business alliance was trying to recruit local merchants to attend the court hearing of a local houseless woman. That houseless woman, whose name was Jennifer, had lived in the community for years. She had a drinking problem and a number of emotional issues. She could be loud and, at times, insulting. Basically, she was bad for business, and when the business alliance heard that she was facing an open container charge, they decided to use that situation as leverage to remove her from the community.

The business owners involved hoped to get an injunction barring Jennifer from being in their business district. They thought the judge and prosecutor would be willing to broker that deal if enough of them packed the courtroom to speak out about all the trouble she caused. Upon reading this, we quickly realized we needed to pack the courtroom with community opposition to this proposed exile. That task proved much easier than you’d imagine, as Jennifer was actually quite loved by a number of people in our neighborhood.

It was the moment many had been waiting for. On January 2, Palestine’s United Nations envoy, Riyad Mansour formally requested membership at the International Criminal Court (ICC).

"We are seeking justice for all the victims that have been killed by Israel, the occupying power," he said.

Jan 07

#BlackLivesMatter: Because to Many, They Don't

By Stephanie Panousieris, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

For the past few months, news feeds and timelines have filled up with opinions about the current #BlackLivesMatter movement gaining strength and solidarity across the country. The deaths of Michael BrownEric GarnerAkai GurleyTamir RiceKajieme Powell, and the growing list of unarmed people of color killed at the hands of law enforcement have sparked an important conversation about targeted, aggressive, and racialized encounters between police and the black community. The increased militarization of the police force, use of mass incarceration and excessive sentencing and the prevalence of the politics of fear against communities of color so deeply embedded into our public consciousness are all being brought to the forefront of a national conversation about race and justice.

If you choose to engage with or participate in this growing conversation, you do not have to look very long or very hard to understand that Americans are not terribly comfortable with facing our nation's history of racial injustice and its legacy in modernity. It is truly astonishing to read the opinions so bravely put forth from behind the veil of anonymity and protection of a computer screen, where the vast majority of contributors enter online conversations confidently, armed with definitive and defensive conclusions about racialized policing. Yet this argumentative rhetoric is often just an echo of the opinions set forth on the nightly news cycle of one's choice, and it is obvious that we are much more comfortable challenging the reality of a difficult history than engaging with its consequences.

It couldn't be known until now.

San Francisco Chronicle article on Jan. 1, 2015 has revealed that former US judges requested clemency for the Cuban Five in early 2014 by a letter hand-delivered to President Barack Obama.

Nine retired appellate court judges from California, Washington, Montana and Iowa submitted the Feb. 24, 2014 letter to Obama, urging clemency for the three remaining members of the Five, a deed that only became public after Gerardo Hernández, Ramón Labañino and Antonio Guerrero were home.

Jan 07

On Community, Redemption and Leadership

By Yusef Bunchy Shakur, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

Yusef Bunchy Shakur is a father, motivational speaker, entrepreneur, self-published author of three books (The Window 2 My SoulRedemptive Soul and My Soul Looks Back), documentary filmmaker (Detroit's Native Son) and community leader. Every year, he organizes a Restoring the Neighbor Back to the Hood event which feeds hundreds of families, provides clothing and hands out backpacks to over 500 kids. He was also wrongfully convicted in 1992 for assault in an unarmed robbery case and sentenced to a five-to-fifteen year term. He was 19 at the time and would serve 9 years, released ultimately in January of 2001. Since then, he has been at the forefront of resistance and restoration in Detroit.

Shakur spoke to Truthout about how he came to be in that position.

More than half a century ago, Hannah Arendt made an observation about aspects of human nature most people fail to acknowledge or confront. Arendt, a Jew who fled Germany during the Nazi's rise to power, survived to witness the trial of German Nazi Lieutenant Colonel Adolf Eichmann. She pointed to wartime atrocities where dutiful administrators like Eichmann become mass murderers with neither regret nor even conscious recognition of the routine horror they inflicted. She called it the "banality of evil" - a systemic evil that had become "terrifyingly normal."

Fascism comes in all shapes and forms. The late comedian George Carlin once pointed out that fascism will not come to America in "brown and black shirts" or "jack boots," but in "Nike sneakers and smiley shirts." With NSA mass surveillance and the recent Senate CIA torture report evidencing murder of innocent people in offshore US prisons, a kind of systematic evil is semi-secretly being carried out within present day society.

Jan 06

A Bad End to a Bad Year

By Dr. James J. Zogby, Truthout | Op-Ed

The closing weeks of 2014 spelled disaster for US leadership and the rule of law.

During the last two weeks of December, the US countered three different efforts designed to affirm Palestinian rights. It was unfortunate since in doing so the US undercut its stated commitments to uphold the rule of law in international relations and to support a non-violent resolution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.