Thursday, 23 February 2017 / TRUTH-OUT.ORG

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Speakout

Speakout is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. Speakout articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

When folks normally speak of white privilege, it means a set of social advantages that white people have without even recognizing it. Peggy McIntosh famously described it as a backpack full of "unearned assets." It is the ability to move about in the world freely without concern over the assumptions that people are making about you because of the color of your skin. It is the ability to assume that your experience is universal. But white privilege is not simply a set of advantages that white people passively accumulate.

Member-owners of La Montañita cooperative in New Mexico have organized a broad coalition to "Take Back the Co-op!" In the process of trying to get their co-op back on track, they have uncovered some disturbing patterns in the national co-op landscape that raise alarm for the future health and integrity of local food co-ops all around the country. La Montañita is a 40-year-old cooperative with six stores in three cities. La Montañita's first store was established in Albuquerque, New Mexico's biggest city.

On October 19, faculty members at the 14 state universities that form the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE) went on strike after state officials and the faculty union, the Association of State College and University Faculties (ASCUF), could not come to an agreement. The night before, talks between the two parties ceased when state officials made their last best offer to union negotiators. The next day, the faculty at all of the PASSHE campuses -- along with many students -- walked the picket lines, carrying signs reading off their demands. After three days, the ASCUF and state officials reached an agreement and the strike ended.

Historically, the Republican National Convention (RNC) and Democratic National Convention (DNC) have been times of increased surveillance, policing and attempts to close public space, chill free speech and stifle dissent. Four months before the 1968 DNC in Chicago, Congress passed the "Rap Brown Law," which made it illegal to cross state lines with intentions to incite or organize a riot. The law was used to indict protesters during the convention, leading to the "Chicago Eight," comprised of Abbie Hoffman, Jerry Rubin, David Dellinger, Rennie Davis, John Froines, Lee Weiner Bobby Seale, and the late Tom Hayden, who died October 24, 2016.

Forty-two percent of the people who came to the Calais Refugee Camp are from warring parts of Sudan and South Sudan; 32 percent are from Afghanistan. Others are from Syria, Yemen, Iraqi Kurdistan, Pakistan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Egypt and more; they have crossed between six and 13 countries to arrive in Calais, with their final goal to reach the UK. In Calais, it seems they are facing the hardest border to cross.

There is no legal basis for the United States to be in Syria, either under international law or under US law. US actions in the country are in violation of international laws regarding unprovoked attacks against sovereign nations, and Congress never authorized the use of force in Syria. Yet without any legal basis at all, in October 2015, the Obama administration sent special forces to Syria. Now, the administration threatens a no-fly zone, meaning that Syria could not fly over its own airspace. Despite the complete lack of legal basis to send in troops or to impose a no-fly zone, Congress and the mainstream media are silent.

Oct 26

Snatching Victory From the Jaws of Defeat

By Michael N. Nagler, Speakout | Op-Ed

In less than two weeks, voters in this badly divided nation will decide who shall be the president of the United States for the next four years. "Will we win or lose?" is the question asked by nearly everyone. That is misleading.  In the very fabric of the campaign, with its race to the bottom of vulgarity and vituperation, we have lost the vitality of our political culture, and are beginning to lose any claim we had to real democracy.

Electronic health records (EHRs) have become adopted for widespread use by a growing majority of US physicians. It has been assumed that the wider adoption of EHRs would improve efficiency and patient safety, reduce diagnostic testing and medical errors, improve continuity and quality of care, and save money. Their use was accelerated by the Affordable Care Act after its passage in 2010. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services have further stimulated their adoption by developing "meaningful use" criteria tied to reimbursement levels.

I've written often about our Iraqi refugee friend and his oldest son from Baghdad. I will call them Mohammed and Ahmed. They made the torturous flight last year from Baghdad to Kurdistan and then across Turkey. They were on three Greek islands before permission was granted them to continue their trip. They passed through several countries at the time the borders were being closed. They arrived finally at their destination in late September 2015: Finland. Having lived with this family in Baghdad, I have the faces ofthe wife and each of the children before me.

Oct 24

This Is Bigger Than Freedom of the Press

By Bishop Dwayne Royster, Speakout | Op-Ed

Amy Goodman, host of Democracy Now!, was among the first journalists to cover the impact of an 1,110 mile pipeline that would carry barrels of oil from North Dakota to Illinois. The oil route intersects with the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation at Fort Yates, North Dakota, and rightly generates passionate concern. More than 300 tribal groups have formed a peaceful resistance to protect ancestral land and Standing Rock's sole water source.

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Speakout

Speakout is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. Speakout articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

When folks normally speak of white privilege, it means a set of social advantages that white people have without even recognizing it. Peggy McIntosh famously described it as a backpack full of "unearned assets." It is the ability to move about in the world freely without concern over the assumptions that people are making about you because of the color of your skin. It is the ability to assume that your experience is universal. But white privilege is not simply a set of advantages that white people passively accumulate.

Member-owners of La Montañita cooperative in New Mexico have organized a broad coalition to "Take Back the Co-op!" In the process of trying to get their co-op back on track, they have uncovered some disturbing patterns in the national co-op landscape that raise alarm for the future health and integrity of local food co-ops all around the country. La Montañita is a 40-year-old cooperative with six stores in three cities. La Montañita's first store was established in Albuquerque, New Mexico's biggest city.

On October 19, faculty members at the 14 state universities that form the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE) went on strike after state officials and the faculty union, the Association of State College and University Faculties (ASCUF), could not come to an agreement. The night before, talks between the two parties ceased when state officials made their last best offer to union negotiators. The next day, the faculty at all of the PASSHE campuses -- along with many students -- walked the picket lines, carrying signs reading off their demands. After three days, the ASCUF and state officials reached an agreement and the strike ended.

Historically, the Republican National Convention (RNC) and Democratic National Convention (DNC) have been times of increased surveillance, policing and attempts to close public space, chill free speech and stifle dissent. Four months before the 1968 DNC in Chicago, Congress passed the "Rap Brown Law," which made it illegal to cross state lines with intentions to incite or organize a riot. The law was used to indict protesters during the convention, leading to the "Chicago Eight," comprised of Abbie Hoffman, Jerry Rubin, David Dellinger, Rennie Davis, John Froines, Lee Weiner Bobby Seale, and the late Tom Hayden, who died October 24, 2016.

Forty-two percent of the people who came to the Calais Refugee Camp are from warring parts of Sudan and South Sudan; 32 percent are from Afghanistan. Others are from Syria, Yemen, Iraqi Kurdistan, Pakistan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Egypt and more; they have crossed between six and 13 countries to arrive in Calais, with their final goal to reach the UK. In Calais, it seems they are facing the hardest border to cross.

There is no legal basis for the United States to be in Syria, either under international law or under US law. US actions in the country are in violation of international laws regarding unprovoked attacks against sovereign nations, and Congress never authorized the use of force in Syria. Yet without any legal basis at all, in October 2015, the Obama administration sent special forces to Syria. Now, the administration threatens a no-fly zone, meaning that Syria could not fly over its own airspace. Despite the complete lack of legal basis to send in troops or to impose a no-fly zone, Congress and the mainstream media are silent.

Oct 26

Snatching Victory From the Jaws of Defeat

By Michael N. Nagler, Speakout | Op-Ed

In less than two weeks, voters in this badly divided nation will decide who shall be the president of the United States for the next four years. "Will we win or lose?" is the question asked by nearly everyone. That is misleading.  In the very fabric of the campaign, with its race to the bottom of vulgarity and vituperation, we have lost the vitality of our political culture, and are beginning to lose any claim we had to real democracy.

Electronic health records (EHRs) have become adopted for widespread use by a growing majority of US physicians. It has been assumed that the wider adoption of EHRs would improve efficiency and patient safety, reduce diagnostic testing and medical errors, improve continuity and quality of care, and save money. Their use was accelerated by the Affordable Care Act after its passage in 2010. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services have further stimulated their adoption by developing "meaningful use" criteria tied to reimbursement levels.

I've written often about our Iraqi refugee friend and his oldest son from Baghdad. I will call them Mohammed and Ahmed. They made the torturous flight last year from Baghdad to Kurdistan and then across Turkey. They were on three Greek islands before permission was granted them to continue their trip. They passed through several countries at the time the borders were being closed. They arrived finally at their destination in late September 2015: Finland. Having lived with this family in Baghdad, I have the faces ofthe wife and each of the children before me.

Oct 24

This Is Bigger Than Freedom of the Press

By Bishop Dwayne Royster, Speakout | Op-Ed

Amy Goodman, host of Democracy Now!, was among the first journalists to cover the impact of an 1,110 mile pipeline that would carry barrels of oil from North Dakota to Illinois. The oil route intersects with the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation at Fort Yates, North Dakota, and rightly generates passionate concern. More than 300 tribal groups have formed a peaceful resistance to protect ancestral land and Standing Rock's sole water source.